All posts by Maidenhead podiatry

What is a Podiatrist?

What is a Podiatrist and what can they do for me?

This article will guide you through the many and varied aspects of Podiatry and help you find the foot care that suits you best. To assist in stopping the development of preventable foot problems and advise you in self care.

To offer a better understanding of the foot care options available to an individual we have split this blog into sections starting with the simplest or self care and escalating to the most complex or podiatric surgery as an end point.

  • Self care and footwear

 

Not everyone needs to become a patient. Many foot conditions can be safely and appropriately managed with the right equipment, skills and confidence.

Many foot health advice leaflets are available through the NHS and the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists and your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

Poor choices in footwear can cause significant foot problems and seeking and following advice to make good choices of appropriate footwear can prevent development of new conditions, aggravation of existing ones and prevention of falls. Again, your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

  • Footcare

Simple footcare is defined as nail cutting and skin care including the tasks that healthy adults would normally carry out as part of their daily personal hygiene routine.

Of course this doesn’t apply to everyone but it is an important aspect of footcare that ensures many individuals check their feet regularly while still mobile and pain free.

For those who do attend clinic regularly for simple footcare, examination of the feet during a routine appointment acts as an early detection system ensuring prompt intervention and prevention of developing more serious foot health problems.

PODIATRY

  • Core Podiatry
  • Nail surgery
  • Warts and verrucas
  • Fungal nails
  • Long term and neurological conditions

 

Core Podiatry is defined as ‘the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of common and more complex lower limb pathologies associated with toe nails, soft tissues and the musculo-skeletal system with the purpose of sustaining and improving foot health. (Farndon 2006).

The main foot conditions affecting older people (as opposed to children) requiring core podiatry are -nail problems, corns, callus, toe deformities, and falls prevention.

These conditions can be managed successfully by Podiatrists in the NHS and Private practice using a range of treatments including sharp debridement (scalpel), pharmacology (creams, tablets, steroid injection) and therapies (often in conjunction with footwear advice and and prescription of orthoses where appropriate0.

Although the call for Nail surgery is small – approximately 8 per 1000 GP patients – there is certainly a need for an effective, non-recurring treatment.

Since the 1970s partial or total nail avulsion has become a standard Podiatry procedure where part (the sides) or all of the nail are removed painlessly to the nail bed under local anaesthetic to resolve recurring problems with ingrown nails.

The likelihood of regrowth is reduced to almost zero (0.5%) with the application of  phenol to the nail bed.

Warts and verrucas are small skin growths caused by the human papilloma virus. Verrucas are warts on the feet, common in children and although harmless they can be painful.

Most verrucas will clear up without treatment within two years but there are numerous treatments available through your Podiatrist including

Fungal nails are very difficult to treat successfully. There are numerous topical applications available as well as GP only prescribed oral medication. Your Podiatrist will discuss your best options and agree a treatment plan.

Long term and neurological conditions include conditions such as Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke and Parkinson’s and a Podiatrist’s management often involves management and prevention of potential escalation of foot problems.

Core podiatry is essential in maintaining the integrity of the feet of people whose medical condition places them at risk of developing complex problems.

Falls prevention. Foot problems in older people are often associated with impaired balance and mobility and where there is a history of multiple falls there are usually more foot issues.

The existence of a corn, bunion or poor footwear choices are often at play and podiatry intervention can moderate the risks.

ORTHOTICS

  • Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision
  • Podopaediatrics
  • Sports injuries
  • Footwear

Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision. Bio-mechanics and bio-mechanical assessment are an essential part of podiatry provision and the discussion of findings and correction of underlying issues with orthoses can have positive implications across the breath of podiatry services.

Many patients present with musculo-skeletal pain caused by bio-mechanical problems which can involve foot, knee, hip and lower back affecting gait (the way they walk).

Often the most cost effective and appropriate treatment is the provision of orthoses (specialist insoles) which modify and correct the bio-mechanical problem.

There are a number of different orthoses that can be prescribed by your Podiatrist depending on presenting condition and patient need. Orthoses range from a simple heel raise or cushioned insole to specific complex custom devices.

Podopaediatrics focuses on provision of Podiatry for children. This ranges from treatment of warts and verrucas to early identification of foot deformities. From gait assessment to prescription of orthoses.

Sports injuries often occur due to abnormal rotation and deformation of joints and/or muscles. Podiatrists target improvement and resolution through bio-mechanical assessment and prescription of orthoses combined with strengthening exercises and footwear.

Footwear choices can directly affect foot conditions. Podiatrists offer advice from correct choices when buying shoes to measuring for custom made footwear depending on requirement.

SPECIALIST PODIATRY

– relates mainly to long term conditions and may or may not be provided within a general podiatry clinic.

  • Diabetes
  • Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders
  • Dermatology
  • Advanced technology

Diabetes care is one of the basic provisions of any Podiatry practice and your podiatrist can offer regular foot health assessment as part of good diabetic control and patient education.

Early detection of foot problems can ensure correct management and reduce the likelihood of critical long term changes.

Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) increase the need for a range of basic foot care services. Up to 90% of people with RA have some kind of foot involvement sometimes leading to the formation of callus corns and occasionally ulceration.

Early Podiatric intervention can improve long term outcomes.

Dermatology can be considered part of core Podiatry as many of the common skin problems seen on the feet are amenable to Podiatric treatment. From tinea pedis (athlete’s foot) to melanoma.

From verrucas to cellulitis you can ask your Podiatrist for advice.

Advanced technology is becoming more a part of day to day Podiatry provision. At Maidenhead Podiatry we use Swift – a microwave treatment – for verrucas, Shockwave for chronic soft tissue pain and Cryopen for freezing warts and verrucas.

EXTENDED SCOPE PRACTICE

Podiatrists who work in extended scope practice usually work in the NHS although they can be available in larger private practices and have undertaken additional training in their clinical areas  and may actively engage in the following –

  • non-medical prescribing
  • requesting blood tests
  • requesting scans
  • interpretations of test results
  • injection therapy
  • advanced vascular investigations

PODIATRIC SURGERY

Podiatric surgery is surgical treatment of the foot and associated structures carried out by a Podiatric Surgeon often as a day case and under a local anaesthetic.

In Conclusion good foot health has a fundamental link to health and well being. Poor foot health can have a significant impact on mobility, independence, and quality of life.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our experienced Podiatrists then give us a call today and make an appointment on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk and help lay the foundations of a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

 

What does walking do to your feet?

What happens to your feet when walking?

The ligaments, tendons, and muscles in our feet support and coordinate movement. So walking helps strengthen them and keeps them supple.

Get up and walk!

Even if your job involves sitting in an office or at home, try to get up regularly and take a brisk walk for at least 30 minutes every day. Feet are adaptable and will withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you enjoy walking, it’s important to wear the right footwear which doesn’t damage your feet.

Walking at a brisk pace for regular exercise helps condition your body and improves overall cardiovascular health. This works in a similar way running and jogging but compared with this high-impact exercise, walking carries a significantly lower risk of injury.

Before exercising

Consult your podiatrist if you start to develop any pain when walking, or consider a visit before embarking on a new walking program.

Current footwear

Properly fitting shoes is the key to keeping your feet healthy and comfortable. Whatever type of walking you do, wearing the right footwear is essential. When buying shoes especially walking shoes, try numerous brands, styles, and sizes. Walking shoes/boots do not come in different width fittings but widths vary with different manufacturers.

Your feet can expand as much as half a size during the day, so buy shoes in the afternoon or early evening when your feet are at their largest. This will help protect them as they expand during your long walks. Also, wearing the same type of socks when fitting shoes that you wear when you walk will help you choose the right shoe.

Once you have made your purchase – take care of them.

Once I have my shoes/boots, what next?

If you are going on a long walk, prepare well ahead. When you first have your shoes/boots wear them around the house. This will keep them clean in case you need to take them back; it also allows you to get used to them on even, consistent surfaces. You can try different socks in the comfort of our own home too.

Wear your shoes for a ‘trial walk’ and build up the distance gradually. Don’t try to complete the Three Peaks on your first trip!

What else can I do?

It’s also a good idea to pay a visit to your local HCPCregistered podiatrist who will be able to give advice. There they will treat any corns, callus, or any foot issue you may have.

Before you set off:

  • Pack simple first aid supplies, such as plasters or antiseptic cream, for your walking trip in case of accidents
  • It’s also a good idea to put Vaseline between your toes to prevent chafing. This makes it an ideal lubricant
  • Applied as a lubricant at the start of an event, such as between the toes, it will still be working well at the end

Warm-up

Begin your walk at a slow pace, increasing the pace of your walking gradually. This gives the muscles, bones, tendons, and ligaments that support the structure and movement a chance to get used to the activity by degree.

If you do experience any discomfort or foot pain, then it could be an indication that something isn’t right. In many cases, early diagnosis prevents a small injury from becoming a larger one.

Six points to remember

  1. When you buy shoes, wear socks that you will wear when walking
  2. Try on and walk in several pairs of shoes/boots
  3. Don’t just put on but lace both shoes of each pair and take the time to walk around to assess comfort
  4. To keep your feet comfortable and free of fatigue and injury, good foot care is essential
  5. Consult a podiatrist if you experience any sort of foot pain
  6. Go through a warm-up and stretching routine before and after you walk

If you would like more information or make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, give us a call on 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

Referred pain, compensation pain and ingrowing nail pain.

What is causing your foot pain?

Our blogs this month have looked at some of the causes of foot pain.

Now, in the last of this series of blogs we look at some of the causes of foot pain not already covered.

Referred pain

This is where the cause of pain isn’t where the pain is experienced.

Sometimes, pain in the feet isn’t due to a local problem. For example, pain can be referred from the lower back. A bulging disc or degeneration of the spinal structures can lead to pressure on the nerve as it exits the spine. Although the compression is in the back, the pain is experienced in the foot. This is why your Podiatrist or Chiropractor will always take a comprehensive history into account during assessment.

There are many causes of referred pain which is why it is important to disclose full history during your consultation.

Compensation pain

This is where the pain is experienced because you are compensating for pain or mechanical malfunction somewhere else. For example, you have a painful corn on your foot. You have tried over the counter products but they haven’t worked. The pain is still there so you don’t put as much weight on the painful area. You are compensating for the pain this is called pain off-loading.

It is an autonomic response the body uses to protect itself. That is why we limp when our foot hurts. It is an autonomic response we can’t control. When we limp though we use the rest of the body in a way it isn’t used to. This can cause muscles elsewhere to fatigue and become painful. That is why when we limp we can find it can make our backs ache.

Your Podiatrist or Chiropractor will also take compensation pain into account during your consultation.

Ingrowing or ingrown nail pain

Ingrown or ingrowing nails come with different degrees of pain and tissue involvement. Some are quite mild with relatively little discomfort. When they are more serious they are often associated with pain and soft tissue structure changes. These changes can include infection, hyper granulation, redness, swelling, and heat.

If you are experiencing any of these changes then it is a good idea to seek professional advice.

It is important that you don’t try and treat this yourself. There are many reasons for ingrowing toenails. First among these is poor nail cutting. This can be compounded by trying to self treat and making things worse. Shoes are the only item of clothing we wear on a daily basis and never clean. The inside that is. When did you last clean the inside of your shoes? This can result in a microcosm of potential infection. Add a cut, scratch, or open skin to the warmth and moisture of the inside of a shoe and infection is often the result.

Remember – pain is a warning – don’t ignore it. If your toes start hurting and you suspect an ingrown toenail seek help from a professional.

Other causes of pain

This list is not at all comprehensive. There are too many other causes of foot pain to be covered here. These include but not exclusively:

  • fracture
  • stress fracture
  • dislocation
  • soft tissue injuries
  • infection
  • skin infection and neuropathic changes
  • verrucas

What can I do about my foot pain?

If you are experiencing foot pain and you would like more information give us a call on 01628 773588 and make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors.

If you would like a comprehensive biomechanical assessment including gait analysis and custom orthotic prescription and manufacture, do give us a call on 01628 773588.

For more information visit www.maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

If you would like to know more about how we are risk assessing and managing our Covid-19 click here.

Why do I have localised foot pain?

Why do I have pain in specific parts of my foot?

This is where the pain is usually sharp or persistent and is often focused on a single point or area.

Toes

Our nails tend to grow more slowly and more thickly as we get older. This is often a result of reduced circulation and years of bashing them against the inside of the end of shoes which make them thicken.

Nails

Nails are protection for the end of a toe. Trauma or repeat stress stimulates the body’s protective mechanism making the nails thicker so they offer more protection. This increases the pressure on the end of the toe and makes the sore and the nails harder to cut. One person in 50 will develop a condition called onychogryphosis. A thickened nail that looks like a ram’s horn – unsightly and painful when pressing against shoes.

This can occur at any age but is more likely as we get older.

What’s the best technique for nail cutting?

Use a file and a good pair of nail clippers on thick nails. Clippers are sharper and have a different cutting action to scissors which can split the nail. Have a bath first and, if you have a partner, and good eyesight, you can always cut each other’s toe nails.

What can we do for you?

People with onychogryphosis benefit from visiting a Podiatrist.

Thickened nails often need to be reduced and shaped with an electric file before they can be cut. This reduces discomfort, pressure and maintains the foot in better condition and prevents it from getting worse.

Why do I suffer joint pain?

One person in six over 50 will develop osteoarthritis in the mid-foot. According to a recent study at Keele University’s Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre. Osteoarthritis is characterised by inflammation around the joints, damage to cartilage and swelling, which causes pain, stiffness and restricts movement. Sometimes it causes bony bumps on the top of the foot. It is possible to develop osteoarthritis just in the feet.

What can I do about osteoarthritis pain?

The foot comprises 26 bones, 12 of which are in the mid-section. A big hip joint is well designed to take the whole body weight but that same weight has to go through each individual bone and small joint in the mid-foot. Risk factors include genetic predisposition, injury to the area and overuse.

Runners and people who stand for a living are more likely to develop problems. Good trainer-type shoes will help to minimise stress to the feet.

Losing weight can ease pressure on joints as well as judicious use of orthotic insoles.

What can your Podiatrist do for foot pain?

If you have pain in the mid-foot or the arch, see one of our Podiatrists for assessment and treatment plan. Advice will usually consist of management and guidance on footwear, padding and exercise but may include onward referral to an orthopedic consultant.

Is my pain due to corns or verrucas?

Commonly found over a joint surface, between the toes or on the sole of the foot, corns are a common cause of pain. They are usually caused by pressure and friction. Corns are areas of callous with a hard central portion that focuses pressure on the underlying structure and can cause momentary, eye-watering pain when compressed. They are formed of dead skin and have no blood supply.

A verruca is different because it is a viral infection of the skin and has a blood supply. Verrucas can also cause pain because they are also rich in nerve tissue. This means that when they are compressed – they hurt!

What is the treatment for corns?

Your Podiatrist can remove your corn completely but if the pressure and friction remain, they will grow back in time. Shoes are a common cause of corns and a change of footwear type can bring relief. Appropriate padding can also help.

Verrucas present a different problem and some treatment options can be found here.

What else could be causing my foot pain?

There are other possibilities including trauma, bruising, Morton’s neuroma, or a foreign body such as a piece of glass or an embedded hair.

If you would like more information, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Foot in vice

Why do I have pain in the arch and big toe?

What is the cause of my arch and big toe pain?

At Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic, our Podiatrists are often asked about foot pain located in the inner long arch or inside of the foot. The pain often associated with pain in the large/big toe joint. It can also radiate up the leg.

When do I get the pain?

When exercising, the pain often doesn’t come on straight away, but can develop some time after starting. What can be happening, halfway through a round of golf or some miles into a walk, is that the small supporting muscles of the foot become fatigued. It may come on more rapidly with high impact exercise such as running. Inflammation may be involved meaning that the pain worsens the day following exertion.

Where do I get the pain?

Pain or discomfort can manifest along the inside of the foot or the inner longitudinal arch. It can also be associated with pain the base of the big toe and into the joint.

Because the discomfort of the foot is usually due to mechanical changes this can refer to compensation pain up the leg and into the knee, hip, or back.

Why do I get the pain?

If you ‘overpronate’ it causes medial or inward rotation of the lower leg, which can cause stress at the knee, misalignment of the hips, and resultant lower back pain. The degree of ‘pronation’ can vary from person to person and used to be known as ‘flat feet’ although the actual cause is more complex. As the muscle fatigue, this allows the arch to over-extend further stressing the support tissues and increasing discomfort.

Think of your feet as the ‘foundation’ for the rest of the body. Ensuring your feet are correctly aligned allows the rest of the kinetic chain or biomechanical relationship between the feet and the rest of the body to function efficiently. Big toe joint pain can be due to a number of reasons including inflammation, arthritis, and poorly fitting shoes.

What can I do about it?

What is most important with any foot pain is to ensure a correct diagnosis. This ensures targeted and appropriate treatment. This starts with a bio-mechanical assessment.

The assessment focuses on structure, alignment, strength, and starts with the foot. This includes pelvis, hips, knees, feet and their relationship, as pain in one area can result in or cause weakness or a structural problem somewhere else.

A biomechanical assessment is essential where there is a pain in the feet or lower limbs but no cause has so far been established. Sometimes simple recommendations on footwear can make a huge difference especially sports shoes. Simply tying shoelaces properly can dramatically increase the support offered to the foot by a shoe. There are many different ways to lace a shoe. For ideas and a bit of fun, click here for lacing ideas.

Pain in the large toe can be associated with this but can also be due to shoe pressure on the inner edge of the apex of the toe.

Buy shoes that have a square toe box to reduce this pressure.

What can we do about it?

Podiatrist Jeremy Ousey has a special interest in bio-mechanics There are numerous choices following a biomechanical assessment. The outcome of the assessment determines the appropriate treatment. If the mechanics of the foot are contributing to injury or pain, orthotics or custom made insoles are prescribed, moulded from a foam impression of the feet.

The orthotics are prescribed in conjunction with exercises and a carefully constructed rehabilitation plan. Footwear is also considered and recommendations made.

Topical treatments such as Shockwave can be very effective in the treatment of foot and lower limb pain.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with Jeremy  Ousey call 01628 773588 or e-mail  info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Why do I have heel pain?

What is causing my heel pain?

At Maidenhead Podiatry our Podiatrists are regularly asked about heel pain which is often at its worst first thing in the morning or when walking after a period of rest.

The first part of the gait cycle, where your foot has its first contact with the ground, is called ‘heel strike’.

During walking and running your heels repeatedly hit, or strike, the ground with considerable force.

For correct function they need be able to absorb the impact and provide a firm support for the weight of the body through the gait cycle.

There are various types of heel pain.

Some of the most common are heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, heel bursitis and heel bumps (Haglund’s)

As heel pain is often associated with inflammation it means that the pain can worsen with rest.

This is why can can be at its most painful when we first get out of bed or when we have been sitting having a coffee and stand to walk.

“Pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!”

Heel spurs

These can generate pain but they are the most commonly misdiagnosed form of heel pain.

You can have heel spurs with no pain and pain with no heel spurs.

Even when pain is caused by heel spurs the pain may not persist even though the spurs do.

If you do have heel spur pain it is usually felt on standing, particularly first thing in the morning when you first put your feet on the floor from bed.

It is not uncommon, though tends to occur more in the over forty age group.

There is nothing to be seen on the heel but a deep localised painful spot can be found in or around the middle of the heel pad.

It is often associated with a spur of bone sticking out of the heel bone (heel spur syndrome), however approximately ten per cent of the population have heel spurs without any pain.

A clear diagnosis requires imaging, usually either X-ray or ultra-sound.

Plantar Fasciitis

Often similar in symptom to heel spurs, pain is usually experienced more to the inside of the heel around the insertion of a muscle called Anterior Tibialis towards the back of the inner arch.

This condition is often associated with over-pronation (rolling the foot inwards) during standing, walking and running.

Pain can also be due to inflexible calf muscles and repeat stress injury.

It can also be due poor footwear choices, old unsupportive shoes and injury, among other causes.

Diagnosis is often achieved with bio-mechanical assessment, with treatment through prescription of specialist custom insoles (orthotics) and the implementation of a rehabilitation and exercise programme.

Shockwave is also very effective treatment for plantar fasciitis.

Heel Bursitis

A bursa is a fluid filled sack the body uses for cushioning or padding, often under tendons.

When a bursa experiences trauma of repeat stress it can swell, leading to bursitis.

Pain can be felt at the back of the heel during ankle movement and there might be a swelling either side of the Achilles tendon.

Pain may also be felt deep inside the heel when it makes contact with the ground and can feel like a deep bruise.

Treatments can include rest, stretching exercises and orthotics.

Heel Bumps

These bumps are also known as Haglund’s Deformity.

This is recognised as a firm bump or enlargement of the bone on the back of the heel where the Achilles Tendon attaches.

Haglund’s are often associated with bursitis.

They are often caused by rubbing of the shoe heel counter and can be quite painful especially during exercise.

Treatments include changing or modifying footwear, stretching and ultimately, surgery.

What can you do for yourself?

Stretching can help with heel pain but it is dependant on knowing the cause so that your self-help is appropriate.

If pain persists consult a Podiatrist for assessment and a treatment plan.

Alternatively, you can speak to your GP who can arrange imaging, physiotherapy and if the pain persists, steroid injections.

Remember – pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!

What can we do for you?

Successful treatment is always based on accurate assessment.

We offer bio-mechanical assessment, gait analysis, custom orthotics and Shockwave – where appropriate.

More information is available on our website.

To make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists please call 01628 773588.

 

Why do I have foot pain?

Why do my feet hurt?

In a series of blogs this month we will look at the causes of foot pain. There are many reasons why anyone can experience different levels and types of foot pain.

Sharp or dull, bruised, or persistent, pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!

This list is not exhaustive but deals with some of the main reasons for calls to Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic.

Ankle/heel pain

This is a very common condition and is often worse in the mornings getting out of bed, or after brief periods of sitting such as having a coffee. Plantar Fasciitis is widely known and there are numerous treatments available from stretching to insoles, from steroid injections to Shockwave Pain can also be caused by heels spurs, heel bursitis, Haglund’s deformity, and Achilles tendinopathy among others.

Arch and large toe pain

Pain is also often experienced along the inner arch of the foot and into the large toe joint although it can be in either of both. Arch pain can be due to changes in the strength and position of the foot and custom insoles following biomechanical assessment may be the best solution. This is common in runners and can be linked to over-pronation. Large toe joint pain can be due to ill-fitting footwear in the past and is often associated with enlargement of the joint and bunions. It can also be due to arthritic changes.

Localised, specific pain

This is where the pain is usually sharp and persistent, focused on a single point. Commonly found over a joint surface, between the toes or on the sole of the foot, the most common cause is corns. Corns are areas of callous with a hard central portion that focuses pressure on the underlying structures and can cause momentary eye-watering pain. Verrucas can also cause pain because they are rich in nerve tissue. This means that when they are compressed – they hurt! There are other possibilities including trauma, bruising, Morton’s neuroma, or a foreign body such as a piece of glass or an embedded hair.

Referred pain

Often pain in the foot or feet doesn’t have a local origin. Pain can often be referred from higher up a nerve but be experienced in the extremity. A common origin of referred pain in the lower back. Damage, degeneration, or repeat stress in the back can lead to the impingement or compressing of a nerve root leading to a reaction in the foot or lower leg.

Our Chiropractors or our Podiatrists will include this in their initial assessment as they form a treatment plan.

Ingrown nails

Anyone who has had an ingrown nail will know how painful they can be. This is where the nail grows painfully into the side of the toe, often made worse by shoes pressing. This can be caused by picking and tearing the nail, poor cutting – usually down the side, or simply be due to bad luck. Some toes are shaped in such a way as to make ingrown nails almost inevitable where others will never experience it. Ingrown nails vary in severity from constant soreness to infected and weeping.

Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic offer a comprehensive ingrown nail treatment service, no matter the condition.

Compensation pain

Pain in the foot causes a person to walk differently or limp to take the load off the painful area. This is the body’s autonomic response to pain. This response is designed to protect the painful area. However, this in turn places increased stress on other structures that have to compensate for the change. In this way, a pain in the foot can cause pain elsewhere such as in the lower back, hip, and knee.

Other causes of pain

This list is not comprehensive and there are many other causes of foot pain. These include:

  • fracture
  • stress fracture-dislocation
  • soft tissue injuries
  • infection
  • skin infection
  • neuropathic changes

Remember, pain is a warning don’t ignore it!

Give us a call!

If you are experiencing foot pain and you would like more information give us a call on 01628 773588.

To make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors, please give us a call on 01628 773588.

If you would like a comprehensive biomechanical assessment do give us a call on 01628 773588.

For more information visit www.maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

If you would like to know more about how we are risk assessing and managing our Covid-19 click here.

In our lifetime we walk over 100,000 miles! Are you ready?

In an average lifetime, it is estimated that we walk about 100,000 miles / 160,000 km.

Just think about that for a moment. One hundred thousand miles! At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are often asked “how does walking affect my feet?”

What are the benefits?

Walking helps the ligaments, tendons, and muscles in our feet to work more efficiently and helps maintain suppleness and flexibility. Walking at a brisk pace for regular exercise helps condition your body and improves overall cardiovascular health in the same way as running and jogging. However, compared with running, walking carries a significantly lower risk of injury.

What can I do?

So even if your job involves sitting in the office or at home, try to get up and walk briskly for at least 30 minutes every day. Consult your Podiatrist if you start to develop any pain when walking, or consider a visit before embarking on a new walking program.

Feet are adaptable and will withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you enjoy walking, it’s important to wear the right footwear, which doesn’t damage your feet.

What about footwear?

The key to keeping your feet healthy and comfortable, regardless of the type of walking you do, is wearing properly fitting shoes or boots.

When buying walking shoes, try several different brands, styles, and most importantly, sizes. Remember, your feet can expand as much as half a size during the day, so buy shoes in the afternoon or early evening when your feet are at their largest. This will help protect them as they expand during your long walks. Also, wearing the same type of socks when fitting shoes that you wear when you walk will help you choose the right shoe and once you have made your purchase – take care of them.

What else should I think about?

If you are going on a long walk, prepare well ahead. Wear your shoes for a ‘trial walk’ and build up the distance gradually; don’t try to complete the London Marathon on your first trip! It’s also a good idea to pay a visit to your local HCPC – registered podiatrist who will be able to give advice and treat any corns, callus, or any foot issue you may have.

Take some first aid supplies, like plasters or antiseptic cream, on your walking trip in case of accidents. It’s also a good idea to put rub Vaseline/petroleum jelly between your toes to prevent chafing.

So, let’s get started

Begin at a slow pace and gradually increase the speed of your walk. This will give the muscles, bones, tendons, and ligaments that make up your feet the chance to get gradually used to the activity. If you experience any discomfort or foot pain, then it may be an indication that something is wrong. In many cases, early diagnosis can prevent a small injury from becoming a larger one. You are never too old to start!

Here are 10 tips to bear in mind:

  • When buying shoes, wear the same socks that you will wear when walking.
  • Try on at least four or five pairs of shoes.
  • Don’t walk too far in new shoes.
  • Put on and lace both shoes of each pair and walk around for a minute or two.
  • Good foot care is essential in keeping your feet comfortable and fatigue and injury-free.
  • If you experience any sort of foot pain, consult a Podiatrist.
  • Build your distance up gradually.
  • Before and after you walk, go through a warm-up and stretching routine.
  • Look after your feet and you too will cover at least 100,000 miles!

For more information on walking or any other foot care issue, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, please call 01628 773588, or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Swift - Effective micro-wave verruca and wart treatment

What can I expect from Swift verruca treatment at Maidenhead Podiatry?

 

Swift verruca treatment

This treatment is an innovative new technology, developed in the UK, which has been licenced for the general treatment of verrucas and warts in Podiatry.

Swift uses microwave energy delivered through a special probe applied to the skin through a disposable head to treat the affected tissue with a thermal reaction. For more information read our blog

How does it work

The usual way verrucas and warts are tackled by the body is as a result of keratinocytes in the skin activating dendritic cells so that T cells clear the infection. In stubborn verrucas and warts, this healing process is interrupted so that the immune system is not alerted to their presence. Swift microwave facilitates signalling between the skin and the immune system by stimulating the keratinocytes to activate dendritic cells.

Also, it is thought the thermal reaction causes heat stress protein production stimulating a strong immune response. The combined response provokes and promotes an immune response that leads to the shrinking and eventual disappearance of the verruca or wart.

What should I expect?

 

The disposable head attached to the Swift machine has a life of 15 minutes and so multiple sites can be treated during the same visit. Most treatments are between 2 and 5 seconds in length depending on the power setting of the Swift machine. Some, following discussion with your Podiatrist, could be up to 10 seconds. Discomfort, or even pain, will be experienced during the fourth and fifth-second ending as soon as the application finishes. Sensation will vary between individuals and there is rarely any lasting discomfort although there may be tingling feeling at the site for 24hrs.

The Swift head is 7mm wide and larger verrucas will be treated in a series of overlapping applications. The skin remains unbroken, there is no bleeding, therefore no dressings are required and it is not necessary to keep the area dry. There is no requirement to modify physical activity following Swift treatment. There should be no scarring or other long term marking of the skin. In the days following treatment, the verrucas may change colour, go dark and can look like a bruise.

Large verrucas may not disappear straight away but will reduce in thickness, or ‘debulk’ before resolving. Some verrucas simply peel off the foot. Many resolve after three treatments although some may require more applications. It can take up to three months after the last Swift treatment for the verrucas or warts to vanish as the immune response gathers pace.

How often do I need the treatment?

Your treatments will normally be spaced over two to six weeks. This is to allow your immune system to work and the skin to regenerate. It has been found that treatments closer together can bring benefit to the effectiveness of Swift but suitability can be discussed with your Podiatrist.

Precautions

 

If any of the following apply to you, speak to your Podiatrist before treatment:

  • Metal pins, plates or replacement joints in the foot or ankle
  • Pacemaker
  • Neuropathy or poor peripheral circulation
  • Poor or limited healing capacity
  • Immune suppression
  • Pregnancy or breastfeeding. Verrucas and warts can increase in size during this period
  • Low pain threshold
  • Young children

If you would like further information about verrucas, our verruca treatment in general, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists call us on 01628 773588 and speak to one of our receptionists.

 

My child has flat feet – do I need to worry?

Flat feet in children

As Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry, we are often asked to look at the feet of young children as their parents ask – ‘My child has flat feet – do I need to worry?’.

All typically developing children are born with flexible flat feet. However, they progressively develop a medial longitudinal arch (the arch that runs down the inside of the foot) during the first decade of their lives.

While a child’s foot is expected to be flat, there is currently no consensus as to how flat this foot should be and while feet are seen to decrease in flatness with increasing age, it is not known how flat they should be at each any given age.

So, is it possible to define the postural characteristics, how flat is too flat and what is to be expected? What is a ‘typically’ developing paediatric (child’s) foot?

One way to is to compare all data currently published describing the typical development of the paediatric foot.

Looking at thirty-four epidemiological (incidence, distribution, and control) papers regarding the development of the paediatric foot, sixteen different common foot posture assessments were identified which used a footprint to measure the reported outcome.

What resulted were some interesting conclusions.

Firstly, the use of the term normal in relation to foot posture is misleading.

There is no such thing as normal in the categorisation of the paediatric foot, a flat foot posture is an expected finding at different ages.

Secondly, the foot posture of the developing child is indeed age-dependent and has been observed and demonstrated to change over time.

Therefore no firm conclusion can be reached as to which age the foot posture of children ceases to develop further because no two foot measures are comparable.

One of the problems with current research is that there is no consensus on how to measurement of the paediatric foot, using valid and reliable assessment tools.

What this means for parents is that if they are concerned about their children’s feet being too flat, they need to consult a Podiatrist so that each case can be assessed on its own merits.

If you would like more information, to make an appointment or to speak to one of our Podiatrist then call our reception team on 01628 773588 or email us at info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

What is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thin layer of tough connective tissue supporting the arch of the foot.

Repeated microscopic tears of the plantar fascia cause pain, usually in the heel and is one of the most common foot disorders encountered by Podiatrists.

It has been estimated that over two million people each year receive treatment for heel pain, which affects as much as 10% of the population during the course of a lifetime and is present in both the athletic and non-athletic.

Heel pain can affect anyone from the age of 8 to 80, but generally affects those over 40 years of age and does not seem to be gender specific and affects both feet in up to a third of cases.

How do I know if I have plantar fasciitis?

To be sure, visit a Podiatrist and discuss your symptoms for an accurate assessment.

However the following is a guide to the classic symptoms of plantar fasciitis and gives an idea what your Podiatrist will ask about.

A careful description of the pain is essential including time of day when pain occurs, current footwear, activity level both at work and at leisure, and any history of injury.

The most commonly stated complaints are pain on getting out of bed, after a long period of sitting, and at the beginning of weight-bearing activities such as walking.

The most severe pain in the morning occurs within the first 50–100 steps and then decreases for ordinary walking.

As the day progresses, pain gradually increases continuing even after physical activities have ceased.

Pain frequently originates in the underside of the heel, sometimes slightly towards the inner side, but may not have a clear focus.

Frequently there is no clear ‘event’ which started the pain.

The pain may be worse when the area is cold or contracted.

The nature of the pain has been described as burning, aching, and occasionally stabbing.

Runners may experience pain at the beginning of the run going off during the activity, and increasing afterwards at rest.

What causes it?

There are a number of possible causes for plantar fasciitis and they often work in combination.

Tightness of the foot and calf, improper athletic training, stress on the arch, weakness of the foot, flat foot, and inappropriate shoes that don’t fit and don’t offer good support are potential causes.

Certain play or work actions or overuse (running too fast, too far, too soon) may hurt the plantar fascia.

People with low arches, flat feet or high arches are at increased risk of developing plantar fasciitis.

What do I need to do to treat it?

Symptoms usually resolve more quickly when the time between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment is as short as possible.

If treatment is delayed, the complete resolution of symptoms may take 6-18 months or more.

Typically treatment begins by correcting training errors, rest, use of ice after activity, shoe evaluation, a stretching (see bottom of page) and strengthening program and orthotics.

Shockwave can bring rapid relief when recovery is delayed.

(Radial) Shockwave is a tried, tested and well-researched treatment used in physiotherapy since the 1990s.

It has gained popularity in podiatry due to its effectiveness.

Of all these stretching and increase in flexibility of the calf or calves is the most important and is key to a successful resolution.

What is an orthotic?

An orthotic is a specialised insole designed to make the foot operate in a neutral position.

For people suffering with plantar fasciitis the insole will correct the pronation which is commonly associated with the condition.

Pronation is the rolling inwards of the foot during walking or standing which can exacerbate the condition.

Depending on the degree of correction required, there are a number of options available, from off the peg – one size fits all, heat mould-able to cast orthotics.

Your Podiatrist will discuss with you the best option to suite your condition.

How long will it take for it to go?

There is no set time for this condition to be corrected. Some people make surprisingly quick recoveries, while others notice a slower but steady progress.

Shockwave can bring rapid relief when recovery is delayed.

As a guide, between one and three months, but if you are unsure whether your progress is sufficient, speak to your Podiatrist to see if your treatment plan can be adjusted to help.

Which stretches will help?

Stretching is an essential part of the recovery process. Here are some ideas –

Stair stretch –
  • Stand on the bottom riser of your stairs and hold on to the banister for balance.
  • Move your foot backwards until only the balls of your feet are on the stair & your heels are in fresh air.
  • Slowly lower your heels until you feel the stretch in your calves.
  • Hold this position for a slow count of six.
  • Do not bounce at the bottom of the stretch as this will not improve flexibility.
  • Return to your original position and repeat ten times.
  • For best results this exercise is best performed slowly and carefully.
Standing stretch
  • Stand an arms-length from a wall.
  • Place your right foot half a metre behind your left.
  • Slowly and gently bend your left leg forward.
  • Keep your right knee straight and your right heel on the ground.
  • Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds and release. Repeat three times.
  • Reverse the position of your legs, and repeat.
  • Do not bounce at the top of the stretch as this will not improve flexibility
Seated Towel Stretch
  • Fold a towel lengthwise to make an exercise strap.
  • Sitting, place the folded towel across and around the arch of each foot in turn.
  • Grab the ends of the towel with both hands.
  • Gently pull the tops of your feet toward you at the same time trying to straighten your leg.
  • Hold for 15 to 30 seconds.
  • Repeat three times.

If you would like to make an appointment for a bio-mechanical assessment call one of our receptions on 01628 773588 or if you would like more information or further explanation please call to speak to one of our Podiatrists.

Why is my back hurting?

At Havelock Chiropractic, our Chiropractors are often asked, ‘why is my back hurting?

Back pain is often thought to be due to “over-doing it”, however, have you ever wondered why so many people injure themselves with simple actions like picking up a pencil or getting out of a chair?

It is important to understand that prolonged sedentary activity can be as bad as excessive unaccustomed exercise and extremely detrimental to the spine.

The Chiropractors at the Havelock Chiropractic encourage you to ‘listen to your body’.

  • It is important to note when you are in pain, how long does it last and how frequently does it return?
  • Is it worse in the morning, through the day or at night?
  • What is the location of the pain, and what is the quality of your pain (ache, cramp, sharp, shooting, burning etc.)
  • What aggravates it and what relieves it?

You may be experiencing other symptoms, such as pins and needles/tingling, cramp, stiffness and loss of motion, headaches, nausea, fatigue, irritability or vertigo, for example. You should not ignore these, be proactive and remember to tell your Chiropractor as soon as possible.

For more information or to book an appointment call us on 01628 773588 or e-mail on info@havelockchiropractic.co.uk

 

Aging Feet?

Aging feet? Do your feet feel like they are getting older before the rest of you? The Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry explain what might be happening.

Older feet naturally develop more problems. The skin tends to thin and lose it’s elasticity. Healing can take longer and wear and tear to the joints over the years may have caused some degree of arthritis.

However painful and uncomfortable feet aren’t a natural part of growing old or something you have to “put-up with”. A lot can be done to improve comfort, relieve pain and maintain mobility.

It’s not too late to start a new routine.

Follow a daily foot care routine and keep on the move. Keeping toenails trimmed and filed will help keep you mobile but you may need help with this from your chiropodist/podiatrist or a friend.

Keep your feet as warm as possible, but not by warming them in front of the fire! Warm stockings or socks can help.

Avoid anything too tight which can restrict your circulation or cramp your toes. Wearing fleece-lined boots or shoes or even an extra pair of socks will also keep you warm but do make sure your shoes aren’t tight as a result. Bed socks are also a good idea.

The older you get, the more you need a shoe which holds your foot firmly in place to give adequate support. Throw out sloppy old favourites as they may make you unstable when you walk.

Look for shoes with uppers made of soft leather or a stretchy man-made fabric which is also breathable. Avoid plastic ‘easy clean’ uppers which don’t allow the foot to breathe and won’t stretch to accommodate your own foot shape.

Many shoes have cushioning or shock absorbing soles to give you extra comfort while walking. When buying shoes, ensure that you can put them on and take them off easily. Check that the heel is held firmly in place – you’ll find that a lace-up or velcro fastening shoe will give more support and comfort than a slip-on.

Your shoes should be roomy enough, particularly, if you intend to wear them everyday. If you suffer with swollen feet, it’s a good idea to put your shoes on as soon as you wake up, before your feet have had a chance to swell.

Exercise can help to keep feet healthy – it tones up muscles, helps to strengthen arches and stimulates blood circulation.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment, call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

How do you choose the right footwear?

At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are often asked, ‘how do you choose the right footwear?’

Keeping your feet healthy is only part of preventing foot problems, is also essential that you wear well-fitting shoes.

So it doesn’t matter if walking, dancing or pounding the pavements is your choice of exercise in 2010, The Society of Chiropodist and Podiatrists offers the following advice to help keep feet fighting fit.

Feet have a rough time of it; we demand a lot of them, they carry us the equivalent of five times around the earth in an average lifetime, and yet we give them less attention than they deserve and we rarely wear the best shoes for our feet.

In an average lifetime, we walk about 100,000 miles, which is tough on our feet. Yet our bodies were designed for moving – not standing still, so walking is good exercise for us and our feet.

Walking helps the muscles and ligaments in our feet to work more efficiently, helping keep them supple and flexible. So whether your job requires you to sit for extended periods, or work from home, try to get up and walk briskly for at least 30 mins every day.

Feet are adaptable and can withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you walk a lot it’s important to wear the correct footwear which won’t damage your feet.

Registered Chiropodists/podiatrists will be able to give advice on suitable footwear. They will be able to suggest suitable ‘warm up’ exercises to ease you gently into your chosen sport, and help prevent injury.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment, call 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.