Category Archives: Chiropractic for Children

We are open! Read how we manage Covid-19 risk.

Although Covid-19 restrictions have eased, we are open, working, and taking appointments for Podiatry and Chiropractic

Covid-19 brought many changes to our lives during the lockdown. Although many regulations have been eased or lifted, wWe are still having to take measures and considerations that will be with us into next year.

As you are reading this we hope you are all well and staying safe.

The purpose of this page is to keep our patients in touch with what we are, and will be doing to ensure they can safely visit the clinic.

We are open and taking appointments for both Podiatry and Chiropractic.

The reception team is waiting to take your call

If you wish to make an appointment for Podiatry or Chiropractic please call 01628 773588 to speak to us or leave your name and number and a short message or email us at info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

What you can expect from us.

  • You will notice that Reception looks a little different.

  • We have perspex sneeze/cough guards for the desks similar to the ones now commonplace in supermarkets.
  • These stand 750mm high and run the length of the desk and provide protection for both staff and customers alike.
  • Reception is once more being used for waiting – socially distanced of course
  • You must still wear a face mask at all times while in the building – if you are exempt from wearing a facemask you must wear a face shield.
  • We ask you not to use the toilets but if you must, you must.
  • All magazines and newspapers have been removed from the reception area.
  • The water cooler will no longer be available to reduce the risk of cross contamination.
  • Your Podiatrist or Chiropractor will be wearing appropriate PPE.
  • Our receptionists will be wearing masks at all times.
  • All door handles and surfaces will be wiped down after each patient visit.
  • Where there is more than one practitioner working, appointments will be staggered to reduce the likelihood of queueing at the desk.

What we can expect from you.

  • Come in – wear a mask – sanitise your hands and wait, socially distanced, in reception.
  • You don’t have to wear gloves and there are automatic hand sanitising gel dispensers in the entrance lobby and reception area.
  • We ask that patients also wear a face mask at all times when in the building.
  • Wherever possible only one person at a time to attend for an appointment unless a carer, someone in the same bubble, parent or guardian is needed.
  • The contactless limit has gone up to £100. Most people will be able to ‘tap and pay’ thereby removing the need to key in an PIN.

During treatments

  • Appropriate PPE (personal protective equipment) will be worn by your Podiatrist or Chiropractor.
  • Between patient visits additional time is now to be allowed for wiping down and sanitising the treatment room after each appointment.
  • Each room contains an industry-standard air cleaner/purifier to ensure as clean an atmosphere as possible.
  • As always, all instruments are cleaned and sterilised between patients and all consumables are disposable.

All these changes will be kept under constant review.

If you have any special requirements please let us know. If you would like an appointment then please call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Ten things you need to do to protect your back when gardening

Mind your back!

As a nation, we love our gardens and spend a considerable amount of time and money on them. That has certainly been the case when national circumstances have forced us to spend more time at home. As we rush to get those jobs in the garden done, in the sunny periods between the rain, there is a risk that we may injure ourselves.

 

What everyone wants is to be fit and healthy enough to actually enjoy sitting in their garden and enjoy the fruits of their labours come summer time, so here are some helpful tips from our chiropractors at the Maidenhead Podiatry & Chiropractic Clinic.

How you can help yourself

1. Dress appropriately

  • Don’t wear clothes that are tight or constrict your movement

2. Gardening is like any other exercise; you need to warm up first

  • Don’t go straight into heavy garden work, start off with lighter jobs first
  • This will lessen the chance of muscle strain

3. Don’t twist again

  • If you have to use a ladder for any of your gardening tasks, make sure you are always facing it. Rather than lean or reach, move it regularly
  • When using the ladder, always keep your shoulders, hips and knees pointing in the same direction
  • Make sure the ladder is firmly and safely planted in position and, if possible, have someone else standing there to keep an eye on things

4. Clever pruning

  • Get as close as possible to the things you are pruning; avoid overstretching to reach the area you are dealing with
  • Invest in some long handled secateurs to reach plants and bushes that are beyond normal reach

5. Digging deep

  • When digging, try not to bend or twist during the movement and alternate the foot you use to drive the spade into the ground.
  • Raking is best achieved with short movements; don’t reach out too far.

6. Potting/planting

  • Use a mat and kneel when doing close weeding work or planting out
  • When potting up your plants, it is much better to do this at a table

7. Take a break

  • Vary your activity; spend no more than 20-30 minutes on any one thing and take regular breaks

8. Be clever with the paving

  • If laying a patio keep the slab close to your body and bend your knees
  • It is sometimes better to bend one knee rather two, as your supporting leg gives you a position of strength
  • If using railway sleepers, two people will probably be needed

9. Plan ahead

  • If you are planning a trip to the local DIY store and buying heavy items, such as cement or gravel, buy smaller bags rather than one big bag as they are easier and safer to carry
  • If you do buy heavy items, ask an assistant at the store to help you
  • Shovel the contents of large bags straight into smaller containers or wheelbarrow from the back of the car
  • If having items delivered, have them unloaded as close to where you need them as possible; this will save the effort of moving them again
  • A specialist garden trolley might be worth investing in to move these sorts of materials around, especially so if you have lots of patio pots to move around as well

10. Allow enough time

  • Planned time allows you to take your time

Our Chiropractors

Our Chiropractors Rebecca Rees, BSc.(Chiro) and Lucy Steel, MChiro have nearly forty five years of experience between them, are members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) and are registered with the General Chiropractic Council (GCC).

Pain is a warning – don’t ignore it.

If you would like more information or are interested in booking a treatment with one of our experienced Chiropractors in Maidenhead, Berkshire, then please call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Baby feet, shoes, bare feet and baby-grows

When should a baby start wearing shoes or should they wear them at all?

When it comes to baby feet, socks, shoes, baby-grows and bare feet there are so many questions. What is best? When should a baby start wearing shoes or should they wear them at all? How do you choose the best footwear?

At birth the human foot is not a miniature version of an adult foot actually containing no bones at all but merely consisting of a mass of cartilage, which, over a period of years, ossifies (turns to bone) to become the 28 bones that exist in the adult human foot.

This process is not complete until the late teens or early twenties, so it is crucial that footwear – when worn – is well chosen so it doesn’t compromise and change the shape of the young developing foot.

What is a shoe? and what do we mean by ‘footwear’?

‘Footwear’ in babies means anything that is used to cover the foot regardless of function. For example, in a new born until they start to stand, any foot covering whether it is socks shoes or baby-grow has a primary function of providing warmth.From a functional perspective, shoes aren’t really needed and there are more likely to be disadvantages and problems from wearing shoes than not wearing them – among them, deformation caused by a poor fit, ingrown toenails, and athlete’s foot.

When is a shoe a fashion accessory?

Manufacturers must take some responsibility for encouraging parents to treat their babies/children as fashion accessories and choose shoes on their attractiveness or coolness, rather than their fit or function.

There are exceptions of course. You have to consider the environment the child is in. You wouldn’t want your child walking on the streets or in the park barefoot, where there might be dog poo, dirt and possible hazards like glass would you? So common sense applies.

When to start with shoes

Wearing shoes at too young an age can hamper a child’s walking and cerebral development. Toddlers keep their heads up more when they are walking barefoot, The feedback they get from the ground means less need to look down, which otherwise puts them off balance and causes them to fall over.

Walking barefoot develops muscles and ligaments in the foot, increases the strength of the foot’s arches, improves proprioception (our unconscious awareness of where we are in relation to the space around us) and contributes to good posture.

The more parents know about the structure of children’s feet, the more we can prevent footwear-related damage being done.

What sort of damage?

Research published in podiatry journal ‘The Foot’ in 2007 suggested that structural and functional changes can result from the foot having to conform to the shape and constriction of a shoe, rather than being allowed to develop naturally.

And the younger the foot, the greater the potential for damage.

Not too rigid

Most children’s shoes are like awful little bricks – too stiff, too rigid, with no flexibility at the sole and too much heel raise. This is of particular concern with toddlers learning to walk, because it can cause them to bounce and tip forward.

A completely rigid shoe will restrict movement of the forefoot to zero. Kids this age should be turning cartwheels, skipping, climbing trees, running around. A shoe like this seriously restricts such playful physicality – make it less fun, and less enjoyable.

Size is important

Just as important is choosing the right size socks. Many parents dutifully check the size of their child’s shoes but never consider or know how to check the size of their socks.

How? Take hold of the toe and heel of the sock and without pulling or stretching it should meet around the child’s clenched fist. All socks should be checked regularly due to rapid growth but also because they can shrink during the washing and drying process.

Not to forget baby-grows?

Easily overlooked, baby-grows can place even more pressure on the feet and restrict growth, especially in a rapidly growing child. If you don’t want to replace the baby-grow then cut the seams at the feet to allow the feet to poke out and use socks for warmth.

…and bare-foot?

As a general rule, in the appropriate environment, whenever possible, bare foot is best in at least the first six years of a child’s life. There is no reason why this can’t extend to adults although common sense needs to be exercised with diabetics and anyone with peripheral neuropathy.

If you would like more information, to speak to one of our Podiatrists or to make an appointment then please call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588.

Ever thought about visiting a Chiropractor and wonder what they do?

Have you ever thought about visiting a Chiropractor but wondered what they do?

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We took some time to speak to our Chiropractic team – Rebecca Rees (BSC) and Dr Lucy Steel (BSc, MSc, DC) to find out a bit more about what they do, how they could help you and about a typical days work, here is what they had to say:

How long have you been a Chiropractor?

Rebecca: I studied for my BSc in Chiropractic treatment at the Anglo European College of Chiropractic in 1994.  I have been practicing for the last 27 years.

Lucy: I studied for my BSc in Human Biology at Leeds University and my MSc and DC in Chiropractic at the University of Surrey in 2004.  I have been practicing for the last 17 years. I have a special interest Chiropractic during and following pregnancy.

What governing bodies are you a member of?

We are both registered members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) and the General Chiropractic Council (GCC).

What is Chiropractic?

Chiropractic is the treatment of spine and mechanical joint disorders. It is a common misconception that Chiropractors only treat backs. They can treat a wide variety of functional and mechanical disorders of any joints in the body.

What is a Chiropractic treatment?

Chiropractic treatment focuses on disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the nervous system and the effects of these disorders on general health. Treatment may involve – joint manipulation, soft tissue work, mechanical treatment such as Shockwave, RICE and rehabilitation advice.

What can a Chiropractor treat?

Our Chiropractors don’t just manage back pain but can also help with a wide range of conditions, head to toe, including –

  • Uncomplicated neck pain
  • Acute and chronic back pain
  • Osteo-arthritis (OA) and joint pain (as an addition to core OA treatments & exercise)
  • Leg pain
  • Prevention of migraine
  • Exercise guidance
  • Tension and inability to relax (through lifestyle advice)
  • Rehabilitation
  • Deep Tissue Massage
  • Muscle spasms and cramp
  • Headaches
  • Joint pain

Treatment is supported with individual advice and guidance about lifestyle, work and exercise to help manage a condition. You may be recommended massage, ice or heat treatment and specific exercises which you can safely do at home.

How do you treat these symptoms?

We help manage the discomfort through working on all the joints of the body, concentrating particularly on the spine/ spinal cord. We use their hands to make specific, gentle adjustments (the chiropractic term for manipulation) to improve mobility of joints, efficiency of the nervous system and release the body’s natural healing ability.

What could your clients expect on their first visit?

During your initial consultation we would explain about Chiropractic care and understand your personal situation through physical examination, observations and X-rays as needed. Our Chiropractors support the treatment they offer with individual guidance on lifestyle, work and exercise to help manage the condition.  We will agree a plan with our clients that best supports their ongoing treatment requirements.

Who could benefit from Chiropractic treatment?

People of all ages can benefit from chiropractic treatment, from a newly born baby to  over 100 years of age. Your consultation will be used to assess your requirements and the appropriateness of treatment. Following informed consent, your first visit will include treatment when assessed as appropriate.

Tell us one interesting thing about you?

Rebecca: My belief is that you are never too old to benefit from chiropractic treatment.

Lucy: My passion lies in the care of pregnant women, babies and children, most of my post-graduate training has been in these areas.

For more information or to find out more about how our Chiropractors can help or to book your appointment, please:

Call: 01628 779900

Email:  info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

Visit:   maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk/treatments/chiropractic/

Caring for your feet and back during pregnancy

How do you care for your feet during pregnancy?

At Maidenhead Podiatry & Chiropractic Clinic we find foot and back care during pregnancy is often overlooked with treatment only being sought towards the end of term, and frequently only because backs seize up or feet can no longer be reached.

Our Chiropractors have a special interest in back and skeletal issues associated with pregnancy. This includes pre and post-partum.

Many changes occur during pregnancy but with forethought and planning they can be anticipated and managed as well as possible during this wonderful time. 

What changes?

Pregnancy means many changes in a woman’s body and there are common changes that develop over the nine month term.

Of these complaints, usually ignored, are changes to back, feet and foot pain.

A woman’s centre of gravity moves forward during pregnancy due to the natural weight gain. This leads to a new weight-bearing stance, leaning backwards to counter-balance the swelling abdomen, adding pressure in the back, knees and feet.

Back and foot care during this period is important and sometimes something as simple as exercises or a set of orthotics – specialist insoles – can bring relief and make life easier.

What are some of the common problems?

Common foot problems experienced by pregnant woman are over-pronation (rolling the foot inwards), oedema (swelling), and the build up of hard skin (callous) or corns as a direct consequence of increased pressure and friction.

This can lead to back an hip pain as well as pain in the heel, inner arch, or the ball-of-the-foot.

Many of these issues can be well managed at home with exercise, stretching and basic foot care. But sometimes it is best to seek the advice and treatment of a professional.

The roll of hormones

Relaxin is a hormone produced during pregnancy by the ovaries and placenta with important effects in the female reproductive system in preparation for childbirth, including relaxing the ligaments in the pelvis to facilitate birth.

This can increase back and hip pain leading to discomfort and soreness with standing and walking. Something our Chiropractors are familiar with and can provide comprehensive advice on treatment and management.

Relaxin also relaxes ligaments in the feet contributing to changes including pain and broadening of the foot. Changes to the shape of the feet during pregnancy are often permanent. Speak to one of our Podiatrists about managing foot pain.

Other changes

Many women may also experience leg cramping and varicose veins largely due to the temporary weight gain of pregnancy.

Because of this, it is important to learn more about back and foot health during pregnancy to help make this nine month period more comfortable.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Chiropractors or Podiatrists, call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01629 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Need help with your feet or back – use our search bar.

Use our search bar the find what you are looking for

Many people visit our website for help or information on Podiatry or Chiropractic.

Both Podiatrists and Chiropractors offer a range of treatments and skills to benefit their patients but sometimes all you need is to be informed.

Below we describe what Podiatry and Chiropractic are and explain many of the treatments and services we offer but if you know what you are looking for then use the search bar in the top right hand corner of the screen.

A large part of what we provide for patients is help, advice and education and this website contains information on definition, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of conditions and all can be accessed through the search bar.

It doesn’t matter if you are looking for something specific or just curious. Give it a go. Find what you are looking for in our education pages and previous blogs. Click on the search bar.

Podiatry

Podiatry is defined as the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders; however, we assess, diagnose and treat from the knee down. We also treat warts on hands.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic is the management consists of a wide range of manipulative techniques designed to improve the function of joints, relieve pain and ease muscle spasm.

Chiropractors don’t only treat backs and can help with any soft-tissue or structural issues.

What is Podiatry?

Podiatry like many health care professions has general practitioners and specialists.

A general practitioner will treat anything from corns to verrucas and from plantar fasciitis or heel pain to ingrown toenails. We are all licenced to use local anaesthetic, perform minor surgeries such as ingrown nail removal and dispense antibiotics, if and where appropriate.

We provide vascular assessment and diabetic screening as a matter of course when requested or required. We have Podiatrists with special interests in areas such as diabetic care and biomechanical assessment and gait analysisGait analysis includes being filmed on a treadmill followed where appropriate by prescription of custom moulded orthotics together with an integrated exercise and rehabilitation program.

Seven Podiatrists and two Chiropractors trained in using the latest treatment and cutting-edge technology for a range of common conditions.

Cutting edge technology

Shockwave, which is a percussive mechanical treatment for chronic, or long-term, soft tissue pain such as heel pain, Achilles pain, hip pain and of course plantar fasciitis although it can be used anywhere in the body. It is used by both Podiatrists and Chiropractors

We were one of the first clinics in the country to use Swift, a microwave generator for the treatment of verrucas. We also offer salicylic acid, freezing and needling.

We offer all general foot care too including fungal nails, athlete’s foot, splits, fissures and infections. We also provide foot care in nursing and care homes as well as a domiciliary/home visiting service.

Contact us

Hopefully you have found what you are looking for but just in case you haven’t, give us a call on 01628 773588 and let us educate you. To find us follow the map and directions or put SL6 5FH into your sat nav.

We have our own free car park directly outside the clinic. Our premises are disabled friendly with no door thresholds and easy access throughout the ground floor. Let us know if you have any special requirements.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment give us a call on 01628 773588, and speak to one of our friendly receptionists or arrange a call back from one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors.

And, we will of course cut your toenails too.

Feet and pregnancy

How your feet change during pregnancy

How can you look after and care for your feet during pregnancy?

At Maidenhead Podiatry we find foot care during pregnancy is often overlooked with treatment only being sought towards the end of term, and frequently only because feet can no longer be reached.

Anti-natal classes provide lots of information and education about the changes to your body during pregnancy but they rarely include the changes that can take place with your feet     

Why do the feet change?

Pregnancy means many changes in a woman’s body and there are common changes that develop over the nine month term. Over the course of a pregnancy the body produces increasing amounts of the hormone relaxin.

Relaxin is a hormone produced during pregnancy by the ovaries and placenta with important effects in the female reproductive system in preparation for childbirth, including relaxing the ligaments in the pelvis to facilitate birth.

The action of relaxin on the soft tissue support structures of the feet combined with gradual weight gain can lead to foot pain as ligaments in the feet relax contributing to changes including pain and broadening of the foot.

Changes to the shape of the feet during pregnancy are often permanent.

This means that your favourite shoes may not fit your any more once you hear the pitter patter of tiny feet.

How do feet change?

A woman’s centre of gravity moves forward during pregnancy due to the natural pregnancy weight gain in the area of the pelvis and abdomen.

This leads to a new weight-bearing stance and often changes the way you walk, adding pressure in the hips, knees and feet. Often a simple set of orthotics can bring relief and make life easier but professional guidance is recommended.

Other common foot problems experienced by pregnant woman are over- pronation (rolling the foot inwards), odema (swelling), and the build up of hard skin (callous) or corns as a direct consequence of increased pressure and friction.

This can lead to pain in the heel, inner arch, or the ball-of-foot, often worse in the mornings on rising or after periods of rest such as sitting and having a coffee.

Many women may also experience leg cramping and varicose veins largely due to weight gain.

Because of this, it is important to learn more about foot health during pregnancy to help make this nine month period more comfortable.

What can you do and what can we do for you?

Some of the changes are inevitable but there are things you can do to accommodate your feet and make them more comfortable including –

  • put your feet ‘up’ when you can
  • wear shoes that allow for the changes
  • avoid heels
  • avoid flat shoes – a modest heel will be most comfortable
  • use foot cream regularly to keep the skin supple
  • visit a podiatrist for general footcare and nail cutting

A visit to a podiatrist will ensure you are doing the best to care for your feet and you will be given advice on how to continue that care before and after pregnancy.

At Maidenhead Podiatry we can treat and tidy the feet removing hard skin and callus and trimming and burring the nails. We can also give advice on bio-mechanical and gait changes and foot wear choices.

In addition, one of our Chiropractors, Lucy Steele‘s passion lies in the care of pregnant women, babies and children, and most of her post-graduate training has been in these areas. So, if back and/or pelvic pain is your problem Lucy will be pleased to help..

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, or Chiropractors call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01629 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

My child has flat feet – do I need to worry?

Flat feet in children

As Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry, we are often asked to look at the feet of young children as their parents ask – ‘My child has flat feet – do I need to worry?’.

All typically developing children are born with flexible flat feet. However, they progressively develop a medial longitudinal arch (the arch that runs down the inside of the foot) during the first decade of their lives.

While a child’s foot is expected to be flat, there is currently no consensus as to how flat this foot should be and while feet are seen to decrease in flatness with increasing age, it is not known how flat they should be at each any given age.

So, is it possible to define the postural characteristics, how flat is too flat and what is to be expected? What is a ‘typically’ developing paediatric (child’s) foot?

One way to is to compare all data currently published describing the typical development of the paediatric foot.

Looking at thirty-four epidemiological (incidence, distribution, and control) papers regarding the development of the paediatric foot, sixteen different common foot posture assessments were identified which used a footprint to measure the reported outcome.

What resulted were some interesting conclusions.

Firstly, the use of the term normal in relation to foot posture is misleading.

There is no such thing as normal in the categorisation of the paediatric foot, a flat foot posture is an expected finding at different ages.

Secondly, the foot posture of the developing child is indeed age-dependent and has been observed and demonstrated to change over time.

Therefore no firm conclusion can be reached as to which age the foot posture of children ceases to develop further because no two foot measures are comparable.

One of the problems with current research is that there is no consensus on how to measurement of the paediatric foot, using valid and reliable assessment tools.

What this means for parents is that if they are concerned about their children’s feet being too flat, they need to consult a Podiatrist so that each case can be assessed on its own merits.

If you would like more information, to make an appointment or to speak to one of our Podiatrist then call our reception team on 01628 773588 or email us at info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk