Category Archives: Chiropractic

We are open! Read how we manage Covid-19 risk.

Although Covid-19 restrictions have eased, we are open, working, and taking appointments for Podiatry and Chiropractic

Covid-19 brought many changes to our lives during the lockdown. Although many regulations have been eased or lifted, wWe are still having to take measures and considerations that will be with us into next year.

As you are reading this we hope you are all well and staying safe.

The purpose of this page is to keep our patients in touch with what we are, and will be doing to ensure they can safely visit the clinic.

We are open and taking appointments for both Podiatry and Chiropractic.

The reception team is waiting to take your call

If you wish to make an appointment for Podiatry or Chiropractic please call 01628 773588 to speak to us or leave your name and number and a short message or email us at info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

What you can expect from us.

  • You will notice that Reception looks a little different.

  • We have perspex sneeze/cough guards for the desks similar to the ones now commonplace in supermarkets.
  • These stand 750mm high and run the length of the desk and provide protection for both staff and customers alike.
  • Reception is once more being used for waiting – socially distanced of course
  • You must still wear a face mask at all times while in the building – if you are exempt from wearing a facemask you must wear a face shield.
  • We ask you not to use the toilets but if you must, you must.
  • All magazines and newspapers have been removed from the reception area.
  • The water cooler will no longer be available to reduce the risk of cross contamination.
  • Your Podiatrist or Chiropractor will be wearing appropriate PPE.
  • Our receptionists will be wearing masks at all times.
  • All door handles and surfaces will be wiped down after each patient visit.
  • Where there is more than one practitioner working, appointments will be staggered to reduce the likelihood of queueing at the desk.

What we can expect from you.

  • Come in – wear a mask – sanitise your hands and wait, socially distanced, in reception.
  • You don’t have to wear gloves and there are automatic hand sanitising gel dispensers in the entrance lobby and reception area.
  • We ask that patients also wear a face mask at all times when in the building.
  • Wherever possible only one person at a time to attend for an appointment unless a carer, someone in the same bubble, parent or guardian is needed.
  • The contactless limit has gone up to £100. Most people will be able to ‘tap and pay’ thereby removing the need to key in an PIN.

During treatments

  • Appropriate PPE (personal protective equipment) will be worn by your Podiatrist or Chiropractor.
  • Between patient visits additional time is now to be allowed for wiping down and sanitising the treatment room after each appointment.
  • Each room contains an industry-standard air cleaner/purifier to ensure as clean an atmosphere as possible.
  • As always, all instruments are cleaned and sterilised between patients and all consumables are disposable.

All these changes will be kept under constant review.

If you have any special requirements please let us know. If you would like an appointment then please call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Ten things you need to do to protect your back when gardening

Mind your back!

As a nation, we love our gardens and spend a considerable amount of time and money on them. That has certainly been the case when national circumstances have forced us to spend more time at home. As we rush to get those jobs in the garden done, in the sunny periods between the rain, there is a risk that we may injure ourselves.

 

What everyone wants is to be fit and healthy enough to actually enjoy sitting in their garden and enjoy the fruits of their labours come summer time, so here are some helpful tips from our chiropractors at the Maidenhead Podiatry & Chiropractic Clinic.

How you can help yourself

1. Dress appropriately

  • Don’t wear clothes that are tight or constrict your movement

2. Gardening is like any other exercise; you need to warm up first

  • Don’t go straight into heavy garden work, start off with lighter jobs first
  • This will lessen the chance of muscle strain

3. Don’t twist again

  • If you have to use a ladder for any of your gardening tasks, make sure you are always facing it. Rather than lean or reach, move it regularly
  • When using the ladder, always keep your shoulders, hips and knees pointing in the same direction
  • Make sure the ladder is firmly and safely planted in position and, if possible, have someone else standing there to keep an eye on things

4. Clever pruning

  • Get as close as possible to the things you are pruning; avoid overstretching to reach the area you are dealing with
  • Invest in some long handled secateurs to reach plants and bushes that are beyond normal reach

5. Digging deep

  • When digging, try not to bend or twist during the movement and alternate the foot you use to drive the spade into the ground.
  • Raking is best achieved with short movements; don’t reach out too far.

6. Potting/planting

  • Use a mat and kneel when doing close weeding work or planting out
  • When potting up your plants, it is much better to do this at a table

7. Take a break

  • Vary your activity; spend no more than 20-30 minutes on any one thing and take regular breaks

8. Be clever with the paving

  • If laying a patio keep the slab close to your body and bend your knees
  • It is sometimes better to bend one knee rather two, as your supporting leg gives you a position of strength
  • If using railway sleepers, two people will probably be needed

9. Plan ahead

  • If you are planning a trip to the local DIY store and buying heavy items, such as cement or gravel, buy smaller bags rather than one big bag as they are easier and safer to carry
  • If you do buy heavy items, ask an assistant at the store to help you
  • Shovel the contents of large bags straight into smaller containers or wheelbarrow from the back of the car
  • If having items delivered, have them unloaded as close to where you need them as possible; this will save the effort of moving them again
  • A specialist garden trolley might be worth investing in to move these sorts of materials around, especially so if you have lots of patio pots to move around as well

10. Allow enough time

  • Planned time allows you to take your time

Our Chiropractors

Our Chiropractors Rebecca Rees, BSc.(Chiro) and Lucy Steel, MChiro have nearly forty five years of experience between them, are members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) and are registered with the General Chiropractic Council (GCC).

Pain is a warning – don’t ignore it.

If you would like more information or are interested in booking a treatment with one of our experienced Chiropractors in Maidenhead, Berkshire, then please call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Baby feet, shoes, bare feet and baby-grows

When should a baby start wearing shoes or should they wear them at all?

When it comes to baby feet, socks, shoes, baby-grows and bare feet there are so many questions. What is best? When should a baby start wearing shoes or should they wear them at all? How do you choose the best footwear?

At birth the human foot is not a miniature version of an adult foot actually containing no bones at all but merely consisting of a mass of cartilage, which, over a period of years, ossifies (turns to bone) to become the 28 bones that exist in the adult human foot.

This process is not complete until the late teens or early twenties, so it is crucial that footwear – when worn – is well chosen so it doesn’t compromise and change the shape of the young developing foot.

What is a shoe? and what do we mean by ‘footwear’?

‘Footwear’ in babies means anything that is used to cover the foot regardless of function. For example, in a new born until they start to stand, any foot covering whether it is socks shoes or baby-grow has a primary function of providing warmth.From a functional perspective, shoes aren’t really needed and there are more likely to be disadvantages and problems from wearing shoes than not wearing them – among them, deformation caused by a poor fit, ingrown toenails, and athlete’s foot.

When is a shoe a fashion accessory?

Manufacturers must take some responsibility for encouraging parents to treat their babies/children as fashion accessories and choose shoes on their attractiveness or coolness, rather than their fit or function.

There are exceptions of course. You have to consider the environment the child is in. You wouldn’t want your child walking on the streets or in the park barefoot, where there might be dog poo, dirt and possible hazards like glass would you? So common sense applies.

When to start with shoes

Wearing shoes at too young an age can hamper a child’s walking and cerebral development. Toddlers keep their heads up more when they are walking barefoot, The feedback they get from the ground means less need to look down, which otherwise puts them off balance and causes them to fall over.

Walking barefoot develops muscles and ligaments in the foot, increases the strength of the foot’s arches, improves proprioception (our unconscious awareness of where we are in relation to the space around us) and contributes to good posture.

The more parents know about the structure of children’s feet, the more we can prevent footwear-related damage being done.

What sort of damage?

Research published in podiatry journal ‘The Foot’ in 2007 suggested that structural and functional changes can result from the foot having to conform to the shape and constriction of a shoe, rather than being allowed to develop naturally.

And the younger the foot, the greater the potential for damage.

Not too rigid

Most children’s shoes are like awful little bricks – too stiff, too rigid, with no flexibility at the sole and too much heel raise. This is of particular concern with toddlers learning to walk, because it can cause them to bounce and tip forward.

A completely rigid shoe will restrict movement of the forefoot to zero. Kids this age should be turning cartwheels, skipping, climbing trees, running around. A shoe like this seriously restricts such playful physicality – make it less fun, and less enjoyable.

Size is important

Just as important is choosing the right size socks. Many parents dutifully check the size of their child’s shoes but never consider or know how to check the size of their socks.

How? Take hold of the toe and heel of the sock and without pulling or stretching it should meet around the child’s clenched fist. All socks should be checked regularly due to rapid growth but also because they can shrink during the washing and drying process.

Not to forget baby-grows?

Easily overlooked, baby-grows can place even more pressure on the feet and restrict growth, especially in a rapidly growing child. If you don’t want to replace the baby-grow then cut the seams at the feet to allow the feet to poke out and use socks for warmth.

…and bare-foot?

As a general rule, in the appropriate environment, whenever possible, bare foot is best in at least the first six years of a child’s life. There is no reason why this can’t extend to adults although common sense needs to be exercised with diabetics and anyone with peripheral neuropathy.

If you would like more information, to speak to one of our Podiatrists or to make an appointment then please call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588.

How to achieve pain-free sleep

Are you having sleepless nights?

Our Chiropractors are frequently asked about night pain and interrupted sleep. This is a surprisingly common problem and has many possible causes and many possible solutions.

Tips for Pain-Free Sleeping from the Chiropractors at Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic

Sleep is so important to our health. Deep sleep allows the body to better heal when it is damaged or fighting infection.

It affects our mood and our ability to function. and it also greatly affects how intensely we feel pain.

Do you move when asleep?

We are often unaware that generally we re-position ourselves 20 times or so during the course of a night’s sleep to avoid painful pressure points and uncomfortable positions.

However, if you are intoxicated from too much alcohol or drugs, when you fall asleep you tend to move very little, if at all, through the night and this can explain whilst waking after a ‘heavy night’ you can feel so stiff!

Pillows and mattresses

Advice on pillows, mattresses and sleeping positions are so important because buying what we sleep on and in, should be done with care.

Whenever possible look for a ‘try-before-you-buy’ product that you can spend a good 15mins lying on to help you decide if you will be comfortable for many hours and years to come. Some mattress manufacturers now offer a money back guarantee.

Ask yourself, “is the product large/wide enough for my partner and I?”

How good is it and long will it last?

When buying a bed remember you will be getting in and out of it for many years, at times when you may well be less fit and mobile than you currently are!

Beware of flashy wording and branding and products long on promise and short on quality. Believe it or not, despite the craze for “orthopaedic” mattresses and pillows, there are minimal regulations governing how manufacturers describe their own goods, and a well-branded item is not necessarily better than another.

Best to make your own comparison and find the one that’s right for you.

……..and what about the mattress and base?

How firm should a mattress be?

Individuals require different mattresses, so finding a balance for you and your partner’s needs is important, but it isn’t the only thing you need to consider.

…and the bed base?

The base of the bed will greatly affect the support you get, so an ageing, worn mattress on a hard base may provide enough support, whilst a firm mattress on a soft base may be inadequate.

Generally the heavier you are the more support you need.

The deeper you sag into a soft mattress and base, the harder you will find it to turn, so do try moving and turning on any you try before buying.

Remember to turn your mattress to get the most life out of it. (Some manufacturers specify that their mattresses shouldn’t be turned, so always read the label)

If you opt for a spring-filled mattress, choosing one with more springs should give better comfort and support.

If you wish to get a little more comfort but can’t afford a new mattress, consider a mattress topper. Usually made of memory foam, a mattress topper will help conform to the shape of your back while you sleep.

Our Chiropractors have over thirty years of experience between them and commonly consult on a range of conditions from low back pain to headaches, from elbow pain to referred pain as well as a range of mechanical, structural and functional issues.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Chiropractors, call 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

(Radial) Shockwave Therapy (SWT)

(Radial) SHOCKWAVE Therapy (SWT)

Radial Shockwave is a tried, tested, and well-researched treatment used in physiotherapy since the 1990s. It has gained popularity due to its effectiveness and application across a wide range of professions.

What would you use it for?

SWT is used by both our podiatrists and our chiropractors to treat a variety of conditions including those listed below. The list isn’t exclusive:

  • Heel pain – Plantar fasciitis
  • Shoulder pain
  • Tennis elbow – lateral epicondylitis
  • Golfer’s elbow – medial epicondylitis
  • Heel spur
  • Hip pain
  • Rotator cuff – calcifying tendonitis
  • Jumper’s knee – quadriceps tendonitis
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Chronic tendinopathy including Achilles tendonitis

How does it work?

Shockwaves are transient acoustic waves which uniquely transmit high energy peaks used to both disintegrate and heal.

Shockwave Therapy is supported by numerous clinical studies attesting to its healing and reparative effects on tissue with over 80% success in relieving symptoms and reducing or eliminating pain.

SWT is tested and approved by physicians all over the world and used from out-patient clinics to amateur sportspeople to Olympic athletes. Also is used in rehabilitation, podiatry, chiropractic, physiotherapy, orthopaedics, veterinary medicine, aesthetics, and dermatology.

Medical effects

The high energy peak acoustic waves generated by SWT interact with tissue stimulating the medical effects of accelerating tissue repair and cell growth, reducing pain, and improving range of movement.

Some of the independent and combined effects of SWT are:

  • Capillary micro-ruptures in tendon and bone trigger repair processes leading to the creation of new blood vessels reversing chronic inflammation by increasing mast cell activity
  • Collagen production is stimulated by accelerated procollagen synthesis
  • Breaking down of calcium build-up in calcific disorders
  • Dispersion of pain mediators
  • Trigger point release.

Frequently asked questions

Will Shock Wave Therapy help me?

Most people experiencing chronic pain have unsuccessfully tried other treatments. Over 80% of the same people worldwide report SWT has helped resolve their condition.

How long does it take?

The application of SWT within your appointment is normally completed in around five minutes.

Does it hurt?

Depending on the level of pain already being experienced in the area to be treated there may be some discomfort. Treatments normally last less than five minutes meaning that any discomfort is tolerable but the intensity can be varied during the session to suit patient preference.

How many treatments will I need?

This varies depending on the nature of the condition being treated and the response of the patient. Effects are cumulative, typically more than one but fewer than six visits with relief normally experienced from the first visit onwards.

Will there be any soreness afterwards?

Sometimes there may be some tenderness for a short period but nothing intolerable or limiting.

Is there anything I can’t do following treatment?

It is sensible to avoid physical exertion for a couple of days following treatment to allow healing to take place.

If you would like more information or to book an appointment with one of our podiatrists or chiropractors please call 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

Ever thought about visiting a Chiropractor and wonder what they do?

Have you ever thought about visiting a Chiropractor but wondered what they do?

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We took some time to speak to our Chiropractic team – Rebecca Rees (BSC) and Dr Lucy Steel (BSc, MSc, DC) to find out a bit more about what they do, how they could help you and about a typical days work, here is what they had to say:

How long have you been a Chiropractor?

Rebecca: I studied for my BSc in Chiropractic treatment at the Anglo European College of Chiropractic in 1994.  I have been practicing for the last 27 years.

Lucy: I studied for my BSc in Human Biology at Leeds University and my MSc and DC in Chiropractic at the University of Surrey in 2004.  I have been practicing for the last 17 years. I have a special interest Chiropractic during and following pregnancy.

What governing bodies are you a member of?

We are both registered members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) and the General Chiropractic Council (GCC).

What is Chiropractic?

Chiropractic is the treatment of spine and mechanical joint disorders. It is a common misconception that Chiropractors only treat backs. They can treat a wide variety of functional and mechanical disorders of any joints in the body.

What is a Chiropractic treatment?

Chiropractic treatment focuses on disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the nervous system and the effects of these disorders on general health. Treatment may involve – joint manipulation, soft tissue work, mechanical treatment such as Shockwave, RICE and rehabilitation advice.

What can a Chiropractor treat?

Our Chiropractors don’t just manage back pain but can also help with a wide range of conditions, head to toe, including –

  • Uncomplicated neck pain
  • Acute and chronic back pain
  • Osteo-arthritis (OA) and joint pain (as an addition to core OA treatments & exercise)
  • Leg pain
  • Prevention of migraine
  • Exercise guidance
  • Tension and inability to relax (through lifestyle advice)
  • Rehabilitation
  • Deep Tissue Massage
  • Muscle spasms and cramp
  • Headaches
  • Joint pain

Treatment is supported with individual advice and guidance about lifestyle, work and exercise to help manage a condition. You may be recommended massage, ice or heat treatment and specific exercises which you can safely do at home.

How do you treat these symptoms?

We help manage the discomfort through working on all the joints of the body, concentrating particularly on the spine/ spinal cord. We use their hands to make specific, gentle adjustments (the chiropractic term for manipulation) to improve mobility of joints, efficiency of the nervous system and release the body’s natural healing ability.

What could your clients expect on their first visit?

During your initial consultation we would explain about Chiropractic care and understand your personal situation through physical examination, observations and X-rays as needed. Our Chiropractors support the treatment they offer with individual guidance on lifestyle, work and exercise to help manage the condition.  We will agree a plan with our clients that best supports their ongoing treatment requirements.

Who could benefit from Chiropractic treatment?

People of all ages can benefit from chiropractic treatment, from a newly born baby to  over 100 years of age. Your consultation will be used to assess your requirements and the appropriateness of treatment. Following informed consent, your first visit will include treatment when assessed as appropriate.

Tell us one interesting thing about you?

Rebecca: My belief is that you are never too old to benefit from chiropractic treatment.

Lucy: My passion lies in the care of pregnant women, babies and children, most of my post-graduate training has been in these areas.

For more information or to find out more about how our Chiropractors can help or to book your appointment, please:

Call: 01628 779900

Email:  info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

Visit:   maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk/treatments/chiropractic/

Thinking of going back to high heels?

High or low heels?

Now that we have had the first relaxation in the rules that will, in time, lead to us returning to socialising as we knew it, we now have the prospect of returning to wearing high heels.

At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are regularly asked about the long term effect of wearing high heels and it is assumed we will disapprove, but that isn’t necessarily the case. So, here is the low down on high heels.

On the streets of towns and cities all over the country, during lockdown, people have made walking part of their daily routines. Choice of shoes for the task are practical and comfortable, with modest heel, laces and good foot support.

Why would you go back to heels?

There are many reasons for wearing high heels and although they are often worn for work, many reserve them for socialising. Of course, wearing heels can make you feel good, and they can have several effects on not just the foot,

The negative effects of wearing high heels are mostly temporary if they aren’t worn for too long.

Although a modest heel helps the feet work more efficiently, high heels cause you to walk with your weight on the balls of your feet.

How do heels change things?

It is estimated that for each inch of heel, the load on the ball of the foot increases 25%. Therefore, a three-inch-high increases the load by 75% over wearing flats.

Existing (foot) problems that can worsened by high heels include

  • neuroma
  • hammertoes, callous and corns, which are thickened, tough spots on the skin.
  • muscle and joint pain.The body has to adjust for an unnatural gait leading to compensation pain.
  • tightness in your calves and put yourself at risk of knee problems, low-back pain, and even neck and shoulder pain.

However as Podiatrists we are not completely against high heels. For everyday use, shoes with heels that are an inch to an inch and a half are fine. If you wear shoes with a heel of two inches or more, limit wearing them to a few hours, such as at an evening event or a wedding.

When you get home at the end of your day massage your feet and give your calves a nice long stretch too. Also, regardless of whether they have heels or not, always rotate your shoes so you’re not wearing the same pair day after day, This will make sure your feet and calves aren’t moving in the same position for long periods of time.

But I still want to wear them

If you are determined to wear heels then there is a way of telling which heel height could be ideally suited to you – it all comes down to the shape of your feet.

Surprisingly, some women are more suited to wearing skyscraper-high, while others will suffer after mere moments with the lowest of heels.

There is a tongue in cheek way to work out which category you fit into, with a three-step formula to quickly calculate your ideal heel height. Measurement is based on the flexibility of a curved bone that connects the foot and the leg – the talus.

If the talus tilts downwards when you are holding your leg out straight and relaxing your foot, then you have a lot of mobility and can wear high heels with ease, if it doesn’t, then you just aren’t cut out for wearing them and there’s nothing you can do about it.

So how do you measure your ideal heel height?

  • without shoes and sitting, hold your leg straight out in front of you keeping your foot relaxed. If your foot sits at a right angle to your leg without dangling then you have less mobility and will be more comfortable in a pair of flats. However, if the top of your foot follows the line of your leg and your toes pint, then you are a natural heel wearer.
  • to find your ideal heel height, get someone to place a tape measure from your heel in a straight line on the floor, then place a pencil at the ball of your foot at right angles to the tape.
  • Wherever the tape measure hits the pencil reveals your ideal heel height.

This simple formula can make footwear purchases more comfortable, although you still shouldn’t wear them all the time.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors, give us a call on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Over doing the Gardening? Top 10 tips from your Chiropractor to take care of your back

How gardening affects your back

With lockdown anyone who has a garden has been spending much more of their copiously available free time making them look the best they have for years.

As a nation, we love our gardens and spend a considerable amount of time and money on them.  As we rush to get those essential jobs done, there is a risk that we may end up injuring ourselves, especially our back.

What everyone wants is to be fit and healthy enough to sit in their garden and enjoy the fruits of their labour come summer time, so here are some helpful tips from our Principal Chiropractor, Rebecca from Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic clinic:

What can I do? – Top ten tips –

  1. Dress appropriately –

    Don’t wear clothes that are tight or constrict your movement.

  2. Gardening is like any other exercise, you need to warm up first –

    Don’t go straight into heavy garden work, start off with lighter jobs first, this will lessen the chance of muscle strain.

  3. Don’t twist again –

    If you have to use a ladder for any of your gardening tasks, make sure you are always facing it. Rather than lean or reach, move the ladder regularly, always keep your shoulders, hips and knees pointing in the same direction and make sure the ladder is firmly and safely planted in position. If possible, have someone else standing there to keep an eye on things.

  4. Clever pruning –

    Get as close as possible to the things you are pruning; avoid overstretching to reach the area you are dealing with and invest in some long handled secateurs to reach plants and bushes that are beyond your normal reach.

  5. Digging deep –

    When digging, try not to bend or twist during the movement and alternate the foot you use to drive the spade into the ground.

  6. Raking –

    is best achieved with short movements; don’t reach out too far.

  7. Potting/planting –

    Use a mat and kneel when doing close weeding work, planting out or when potting up your plants, it is much better to do this at a table.

  8. Take a break –

    Vary your activity; spend no more than 20-30 minutes on any one thing and take regular breaks.

  9. Be clever with the paving –

    If laying a patio keep the slab close to your body and bend your knees.  It is sometimes better to bend one knee rather two, as your supporting leg gives you a position of strength and if using railway sleepers, two people will probably be needed.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

  10. Plan ahead –

    If you are planning a trip to the local DIY store and buying heavy items, such as cement or gravel, buy smaller bags rather than one big bag as they are easier and safer to carry. Shovel the contents of large bags straight into smaller containers or wheelbarrow from the back of the car.  If you are having items delivered, have them unloaded as close to where you need them as possible. This will save the effort of moving them again and a specialist garden trolley might be worth investing in to move these sorts of materials around, especially so if you have lots of patio pots to move.

Our Chiropractors

Rebecca Rees, BSc and Lucy Steel BSc MSc DC have over forty years of experience between them, are members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) and are registered with the General Chiropractic Council (GCC).

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Chiropractors, call – 01628 773588 and speak to one of our receptionists or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk. 

Visit: www.maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk/treatments/chiropractic for more information on Chiropractic. How it works and what it can do for you.

Caring for your feet and back during pregnancy

How do you care for your feet during pregnancy?

At Maidenhead Podiatry & Chiropractic Clinic we find foot and back care during pregnancy is often overlooked with treatment only being sought towards the end of term, and frequently only because backs seize up or feet can no longer be reached.

Our Chiropractors have a special interest in back and skeletal issues associated with pregnancy. This includes pre and post-partum.

Many changes occur during pregnancy but with forethought and planning they can be anticipated and managed as well as possible during this wonderful time. 

What changes?

Pregnancy means many changes in a woman’s body and there are common changes that develop over the nine month term.

Of these complaints, usually ignored, are changes to back, feet and foot pain.

A woman’s centre of gravity moves forward during pregnancy due to the natural weight gain. This leads to a new weight-bearing stance, leaning backwards to counter-balance the swelling abdomen, adding pressure in the back, knees and feet.

Back and foot care during this period is important and sometimes something as simple as exercises or a set of orthotics – specialist insoles – can bring relief and make life easier.

What are some of the common problems?

Common foot problems experienced by pregnant woman are over-pronation (rolling the foot inwards), oedema (swelling), and the build up of hard skin (callous) or corns as a direct consequence of increased pressure and friction.

This can lead to back an hip pain as well as pain in the heel, inner arch, or the ball-of-the-foot.

Many of these issues can be well managed at home with exercise, stretching and basic foot care. But sometimes it is best to seek the advice and treatment of a professional.

The roll of hormones

Relaxin is a hormone produced during pregnancy by the ovaries and placenta with important effects in the female reproductive system in preparation for childbirth, including relaxing the ligaments in the pelvis to facilitate birth.

This can increase back and hip pain leading to discomfort and soreness with standing and walking. Something our Chiropractors are familiar with and can provide comprehensive advice on treatment and management.

Relaxin also relaxes ligaments in the feet contributing to changes including pain and broadening of the foot. Changes to the shape of the feet during pregnancy are often permanent. Speak to one of our Podiatrists about managing foot pain.

Other changes

Many women may also experience leg cramping and varicose veins largely due to the temporary weight gain of pregnancy.

Because of this, it is important to learn more about back and foot health during pregnancy to help make this nine month period more comfortable.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Chiropractors or Podiatrists, call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01629 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Need help with your feet or back – use our search bar.

Use our search bar the find what you are looking for

Many people visit our website for help or information on Podiatry or Chiropractic.

Both Podiatrists and Chiropractors offer a range of treatments and skills to benefit their patients but sometimes all you need is to be informed.

Below we describe what Podiatry and Chiropractic are and explain many of the treatments and services we offer but if you know what you are looking for then use the search bar in the top right hand corner of the screen.

A large part of what we provide for patients is help, advice and education and this website contains information on definition, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of conditions and all can be accessed through the search bar.

It doesn’t matter if you are looking for something specific or just curious. Give it a go. Find what you are looking for in our education pages and previous blogs. Click on the search bar.

Podiatry

Podiatry is defined as the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders; however, we assess, diagnose and treat from the knee down. We also treat warts on hands.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic is the management consists of a wide range of manipulative techniques designed to improve the function of joints, relieve pain and ease muscle spasm.

Chiropractors don’t only treat backs and can help with any soft-tissue or structural issues.

What is Podiatry?

Podiatry like many health care professions has general practitioners and specialists.

A general practitioner will treat anything from corns to verrucas and from plantar fasciitis or heel pain to ingrown toenails. We are all licenced to use local anaesthetic, perform minor surgeries such as ingrown nail removal and dispense antibiotics, if and where appropriate.

We provide vascular assessment and diabetic screening as a matter of course when requested or required. We have Podiatrists with special interests in areas such as diabetic care and biomechanical assessment and gait analysisGait analysis includes being filmed on a treadmill followed where appropriate by prescription of custom moulded orthotics together with an integrated exercise and rehabilitation program.

Seven Podiatrists and two Chiropractors trained in using the latest treatment and cutting-edge technology for a range of common conditions.

Cutting edge technology

Shockwave, which is a percussive mechanical treatment for chronic, or long-term, soft tissue pain such as heel pain, Achilles pain, hip pain and of course plantar fasciitis although it can be used anywhere in the body. It is used by both Podiatrists and Chiropractors

We were one of the first clinics in the country to use Swift, a microwave generator for the treatment of verrucas. We also offer salicylic acid, freezing and needling.

We offer all general foot care too including fungal nails, athlete’s foot, splits, fissures and infections. We also provide foot care in nursing and care homes as well as a domiciliary/home visiting service.

Contact us

Hopefully you have found what you are looking for but just in case you haven’t, give us a call on 01628 773588 and let us educate you. To find us follow the map and directions or put SL6 5FH into your sat nav.

We have our own free car park directly outside the clinic. Our premises are disabled friendly with no door thresholds and easy access throughout the ground floor. Let us know if you have any special requirements.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment give us a call on 01628 773588, and speak to one of our friendly receptionists or arrange a call back from one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors.

And, we will of course cut your toenails too.

Referred pain, compensation pain and ingrowing nail pain.

What is causing your foot pain?

Our blogs this month have looked at some of the causes of foot pain.

Now, in the last of this series of blogs we look at some of the causes of foot pain not already covered.

Referred pain

This is where the cause of pain isn’t where the pain is experienced.

Sometimes, pain in the feet isn’t due to a local problem. For example, pain can be referred from the lower back. A bulging disc or degeneration of the spinal structures can lead to pressure on the nerve as it exits the spine. Although the compression is in the back, the pain is experienced in the foot. This is why your Podiatrist or Chiropractor will always take a comprehensive history into account during assessment.

There are many causes of referred pain which is why it is important to disclose full history during your consultation.

Compensation pain

This is where the pain is experienced because you are compensating for pain or mechanical malfunction somewhere else. For example, you have a painful corn on your foot. You have tried over the counter products but they haven’t worked. The pain is still there so you don’t put as much weight on the painful area. You are compensating for the pain this is called pain off-loading.

It is an autonomic response the body uses to protect itself. That is why we limp when our foot hurts. It is an autonomic response we can’t control. When we limp though we use the rest of the body in a way it isn’t used to. This can cause muscles elsewhere to fatigue and become painful. That is why when we limp we can find it can make our backs ache.

Your Podiatrist or Chiropractor will also take compensation pain into account during your consultation.

Ingrowing or ingrown nail pain

Ingrown or ingrowing nails come with different degrees of pain and tissue involvement. Some are quite mild with relatively little discomfort. When they are more serious they are often associated with pain and soft tissue structure changes. These changes can include infection, hyper granulation, redness, swelling, and heat.

If you are experiencing any of these changes then it is a good idea to seek professional advice.

It is important that you don’t try and treat this yourself. There are many reasons for ingrowing toenails. First among these is poor nail cutting. This can be compounded by trying to self treat and making things worse. Shoes are the only item of clothing we wear on a daily basis and never clean. The inside that is. When did you last clean the inside of your shoes? This can result in a microcosm of potential infection. Add a cut, scratch, or open skin to the warmth and moisture of the inside of a shoe and infection is often the result.

Remember – pain is a warning – don’t ignore it. If your toes start hurting and you suspect an ingrown toenail seek help from a professional.

Other causes of pain

This list is not at all comprehensive. There are too many other causes of foot pain to be covered here. These include but not exclusively:

  • fracture
  • stress fracture
  • dislocation
  • soft tissue injuries
  • infection
  • skin infection and neuropathic changes
  • verrucas

What can I do about my foot pain?

If you are experiencing foot pain and you would like more information give us a call on 01628 773588 and make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors.

If you would like a comprehensive biomechanical assessment including gait analysis and custom orthotic prescription and manufacture, do give us a call on 01628 773588.

For more information visit www.maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

If you would like to know more about how we are risk assessing and managing our Covid-19 click here.

Why do I have heel pain?

What is causing my heel pain?

At Maidenhead Podiatry our Podiatrists are regularly asked about heel pain which is often at its worst first thing in the morning or when walking after a period of rest.

The first part of the gait cycle, where your foot has its first contact with the ground, is called ‘heel strike’.

During walking and running your heels repeatedly hit, or strike, the ground with considerable force.

For correct function they need be able to absorb the impact and provide a firm support for the weight of the body through the gait cycle.

There are various types of heel pain.

Some of the most common are heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, heel bursitis and heel bumps (Haglund’s)

As heel pain is often associated with inflammation it means that the pain can worsen with rest.

This is why can can be at its most painful when we first get out of bed or when we have been sitting having a coffee and stand to walk.

“Pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!”

Heel spurs

These can generate pain but they are the most commonly misdiagnosed form of heel pain.

You can have heel spurs with no pain and pain with no heel spurs.

Even when pain is caused by heel spurs the pain may not persist even though the spurs do.

If you do have heel spur pain it is usually felt on standing, particularly first thing in the morning when you first put your feet on the floor from bed.

It is not uncommon, though tends to occur more in the over forty age group.

There is nothing to be seen on the heel but a deep localised painful spot can be found in or around the middle of the heel pad.

It is often associated with a spur of bone sticking out of the heel bone (heel spur syndrome), however approximately ten per cent of the population have heel spurs without any pain.

A clear diagnosis requires imaging, usually either X-ray or ultra-sound.

Plantar Fasciitis

Often similar in symptom to heel spurs, pain is usually experienced more to the inside of the heel around the insertion of a muscle called Anterior Tibialis towards the back of the inner arch.

This condition is often associated with over-pronation (rolling the foot inwards) during standing, walking and running.

Pain can also be due to inflexible calf muscles and repeat stress injury.

It can also be due poor footwear choices, old unsupportive shoes and injury, among other causes.

Diagnosis is often achieved with bio-mechanical assessment, with treatment through prescription of specialist custom insoles (orthotics) and the implementation of a rehabilitation and exercise programme.

Shockwave is also very effective treatment for plantar fasciitis.

Heel Bursitis

A bursa is a fluid filled sack the body uses for cushioning or padding, often under tendons.

When a bursa experiences trauma of repeat stress it can swell, leading to bursitis.

Pain can be felt at the back of the heel during ankle movement and there might be a swelling either side of the Achilles tendon.

Pain may also be felt deep inside the heel when it makes contact with the ground and can feel like a deep bruise.

Treatments can include rest, stretching exercises and orthotics.

Heel Bumps

These bumps are also known as Haglund’s Deformity.

This is recognised as a firm bump or enlargement of the bone on the back of the heel where the Achilles Tendon attaches.

Haglund’s are often associated with bursitis.

They are often caused by rubbing of the shoe heel counter and can be quite painful especially during exercise.

Treatments include changing or modifying footwear, stretching and ultimately, surgery.

What can you do for yourself?

Stretching can help with heel pain but it is dependant on knowing the cause so that your self-help is appropriate.

If pain persists consult a Podiatrist for assessment and a treatment plan.

Alternatively, you can speak to your GP who can arrange imaging, physiotherapy and if the pain persists, steroid injections.

Remember – pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!

What can we do for you?

Successful treatment is always based on accurate assessment.

We offer bio-mechanical assessment, gait analysis, custom orthotics and Shockwave – where appropriate.

More information is available on our website.

To make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists please call 01628 773588.

 

Why do I have foot pain?

Why do my feet hurt?

In a series of blogs this month we will look at the causes of foot pain. There are many reasons why anyone can experience different levels and types of foot pain.

Sharp or dull, bruised, or persistent, pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!

This list is not exhaustive but deals with some of the main reasons for calls to Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic.

Ankle/heel pain

This is a very common condition and is often worse in the mornings getting out of bed, or after brief periods of sitting such as having a coffee. Plantar Fasciitis is widely known and there are numerous treatments available from stretching to insoles, from steroid injections to Shockwave Pain can also be caused by heels spurs, heel bursitis, Haglund’s deformity, and Achilles tendinopathy among others.

Arch and large toe pain

Pain is also often experienced along the inner arch of the foot and into the large toe joint although it can be in either of both. Arch pain can be due to changes in the strength and position of the foot and custom insoles following biomechanical assessment may be the best solution. This is common in runners and can be linked to over-pronation. Large toe joint pain can be due to ill-fitting footwear in the past and is often associated with enlargement of the joint and bunions. It can also be due to arthritic changes.

Localised, specific pain

This is where the pain is usually sharp and persistent, focused on a single point. Commonly found over a joint surface, between the toes or on the sole of the foot, the most common cause is corns. Corns are areas of callous with a hard central portion that focuses pressure on the underlying structures and can cause momentary eye-watering pain. Verrucas can also cause pain because they are rich in nerve tissue. This means that when they are compressed – they hurt! There are other possibilities including trauma, bruising, Morton’s neuroma, or a foreign body such as a piece of glass or an embedded hair.

Referred pain

Often pain in the foot or feet doesn’t have a local origin. Pain can often be referred from higher up a nerve but be experienced in the extremity. A common origin of referred pain in the lower back. Damage, degeneration, or repeat stress in the back can lead to the impingement or compressing of a nerve root leading to a reaction in the foot or lower leg.

Our Chiropractors or our Podiatrists will include this in their initial assessment as they form a treatment plan.

Ingrown nails

Anyone who has had an ingrown nail will know how painful they can be. This is where the nail grows painfully into the side of the toe, often made worse by shoes pressing. This can be caused by picking and tearing the nail, poor cutting – usually down the side, or simply be due to bad luck. Some toes are shaped in such a way as to make ingrown nails almost inevitable where others will never experience it. Ingrown nails vary in severity from constant soreness to infected and weeping.

Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic offer a comprehensive ingrown nail treatment service, no matter the condition.

Compensation pain

Pain in the foot causes a person to walk differently or limp to take the load off the painful area. This is the body’s autonomic response to pain. This response is designed to protect the painful area. However, this in turn places increased stress on other structures that have to compensate for the change. In this way, a pain in the foot can cause pain elsewhere such as in the lower back, hip, and knee.

Other causes of pain

This list is not comprehensive and there are many other causes of foot pain. These include:

  • fracture
  • stress fracture-dislocation
  • soft tissue injuries
  • infection
  • skin infection
  • neuropathic changes

Remember, pain is a warning don’t ignore it!

Give us a call!

If you are experiencing foot pain and you would like more information give us a call on 01628 773588.

To make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors, please give us a call on 01628 773588.

If you would like a comprehensive biomechanical assessment do give us a call on 01628 773588.

For more information visit www.maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

If you would like to know more about how we are risk assessing and managing our Covid-19 click here.

In our lifetime we walk over 100,000 miles! Are you ready?

In an average lifetime, it is estimated that we walk about 100,000 miles / 160,000 km.

Just think about that for a moment. One hundred thousand miles! At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are often asked “how does walking affect my feet?”

What are the benefits?

Walking helps the ligaments, tendons, and muscles in our feet to work more efficiently and helps maintain suppleness and flexibility. Walking at a brisk pace for regular exercise helps condition your body and improves overall cardiovascular health in the same way as running and jogging. However, compared with running, walking carries a significantly lower risk of injury.

What can I do?

So even if your job involves sitting in the office or at home, try to get up and walk briskly for at least 30 minutes every day. Consult your Podiatrist if you start to develop any pain when walking, or consider a visit before embarking on a new walking program.

Feet are adaptable and will withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you enjoy walking, it’s important to wear the right footwear, which doesn’t damage your feet.

What about footwear?

The key to keeping your feet healthy and comfortable, regardless of the type of walking you do, is wearing properly fitting shoes or boots.

When buying walking shoes, try several different brands, styles, and most importantly, sizes. Remember, your feet can expand as much as half a size during the day, so buy shoes in the afternoon or early evening when your feet are at their largest. This will help protect them as they expand during your long walks. Also, wearing the same type of socks when fitting shoes that you wear when you walk will help you choose the right shoe and once you have made your purchase – take care of them.

What else should I think about?

If you are going on a long walk, prepare well ahead. Wear your shoes for a ‘trial walk’ and build up the distance gradually; don’t try to complete the London Marathon on your first trip! It’s also a good idea to pay a visit to your local HCPC – registered podiatrist who will be able to give advice and treat any corns, callus, or any foot issue you may have.

Take some first aid supplies, like plasters or antiseptic cream, on your walking trip in case of accidents. It’s also a good idea to put rub Vaseline/petroleum jelly between your toes to prevent chafing.

So, let’s get started

Begin at a slow pace and gradually increase the speed of your walk. This will give the muscles, bones, tendons, and ligaments that make up your feet the chance to get gradually used to the activity. If you experience any discomfort or foot pain, then it may be an indication that something is wrong. In many cases, early diagnosis can prevent a small injury from becoming a larger one. You are never too old to start!

Here are 10 tips to bear in mind:

  • When buying shoes, wear the same socks that you will wear when walking.
  • Try on at least four or five pairs of shoes.
  • Don’t walk too far in new shoes.
  • Put on and lace both shoes of each pair and walk around for a minute or two.
  • Good foot care is essential in keeping your feet comfortable and fatigue and injury-free.
  • If you experience any sort of foot pain, consult a Podiatrist.
  • Build your distance up gradually.
  • Before and after you walk, go through a warm-up and stretching routine.
  • Look after your feet and you too will cover at least 100,000 miles!

For more information on walking or any other foot care issue, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, please call 01628 773588, or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Why is my back hurting?

At Havelock Chiropractic, our Chiropractors are often asked, ‘why is my back hurting?

Back pain is often thought to be due to “over-doing it”, however, have you ever wondered why so many people injure themselves with simple actions like picking up a pencil or getting out of a chair?

It is important to understand that prolonged sedentary activity can be as bad as excessive unaccustomed exercise and extremely detrimental to the spine.

The Chiropractors at the Havelock Chiropractic encourage you to ‘listen to your body’.

  • It is important to note when you are in pain, how long does it last and how frequently does it return?
  • Is it worse in the morning, through the day or at night?
  • What is the location of the pain, and what is the quality of your pain (ache, cramp, sharp, shooting, burning etc.)
  • What aggravates it and what relieves it?

You may be experiencing other symptoms, such as pins and needles/tingling, cramp, stiffness and loss of motion, headaches, nausea, fatigue, irritability or vertigo, for example. You should not ignore these, be proactive and remember to tell your Chiropractor as soon as possible.

For more information or to book an appointment call us on 01628 773588 or e-mail on info@havelockchiropractic.co.uk