Tag Archives: Sore Muscles

Ten things you need to do to protect your back when gardening

Mind your back!

As a nation, we love our gardens and spend a considerable amount of time and money on them. That has certainly been the case when national circumstances have forced us to spend more time at home. As we rush to get those jobs in the garden done, in the sunny periods between the rain, there is a risk that we may injure ourselves.

 

What everyone wants is to be fit and healthy enough to actually enjoy sitting in their garden and enjoy the fruits of their labours come summer time, so here are some helpful tips from our chiropractors at the Maidenhead Podiatry & Chiropractic Clinic.

How you can help yourself

1. Dress appropriately

  • Don’t wear clothes that are tight or constrict your movement

2. Gardening is like any other exercise; you need to warm up first

  • Don’t go straight into heavy garden work, start off with lighter jobs first
  • This will lessen the chance of muscle strain

3. Don’t twist again

  • If you have to use a ladder for any of your gardening tasks, make sure you are always facing it. Rather than lean or reach, move it regularly
  • When using the ladder, always keep your shoulders, hips and knees pointing in the same direction
  • Make sure the ladder is firmly and safely planted in position and, if possible, have someone else standing there to keep an eye on things

4. Clever pruning

  • Get as close as possible to the things you are pruning; avoid overstretching to reach the area you are dealing with
  • Invest in some long handled secateurs to reach plants and bushes that are beyond normal reach

5. Digging deep

  • When digging, try not to bend or twist during the movement and alternate the foot you use to drive the spade into the ground.
  • Raking is best achieved with short movements; don’t reach out too far.

6. Potting/planting

  • Use a mat and kneel when doing close weeding work or planting out
  • When potting up your plants, it is much better to do this at a table

7. Take a break

  • Vary your activity; spend no more than 20-30 minutes on any one thing and take regular breaks

8. Be clever with the paving

  • If laying a patio keep the slab close to your body and bend your knees
  • It is sometimes better to bend one knee rather two, as your supporting leg gives you a position of strength
  • If using railway sleepers, two people will probably be needed

9. Plan ahead

  • If you are planning a trip to the local DIY store and buying heavy items, such as cement or gravel, buy smaller bags rather than one big bag as they are easier and safer to carry
  • If you do buy heavy items, ask an assistant at the store to help you
  • Shovel the contents of large bags straight into smaller containers or wheelbarrow from the back of the car
  • If having items delivered, have them unloaded as close to where you need them as possible; this will save the effort of moving them again
  • A specialist garden trolley might be worth investing in to move these sorts of materials around, especially so if you have lots of patio pots to move around as well

10. Allow enough time

  • Planned time allows you to take your time

Our Chiropractors

Our Chiropractors Rebecca Rees, BSc.(Chiro) and Lucy Steel, MChiro have nearly forty five years of experience between them, are members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) and are registered with the General Chiropractic Council (GCC).

Pain is a warning – don’t ignore it.

If you would like more information or are interested in booking a treatment with one of our experienced Chiropractors in Maidenhead, Berkshire, then please call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Shin splints & metatarsalgia – a guest blog by Jeremy Ousey MSc MCPod

Do I have shin splints?

Frequently patients come into clinic complaining of conditions like shin splints and metatarsalgia.

These are two ‘diagnoses’ which are common labels used by many people, healthcare professionals, sports professionals and our friend Geena who works down the club and gets that exact same pain in her foot… We can all be guilty of it, but what do they mean and why is using these terms a problem?

Well… I’m sure we’ve all had that moment where we are laying in a dark room having maxed out on the pain killers we have in the cupboard and hoping that the clock quietens down with its ticking because it’s making that throbbing in our head feel even worse.

Then that thought comes into our head, “what is causing this pain??? Is it dehydration? Is it just a migraine? Maybe I ate something… and that is a stark reality, we can have pain in an area and not realise what’s causing it and while a migraine compared to an achy forefoot (metatarsalgia) is quite a contrast, we wouldn’t want the doctor treating our migraine like a hangover, and even less would we like him to treat our hangover like a migraine!

So why are shin splints, metatarsalgia and arthritis such a series of misnomers? Well, let’s break them down…

Shin splints

Shin splints is a term that gets used so interchangeably that it’s hard to know what people mean, but the commonly accepted diagnosis that it is linked to is “medial tibial stress syndrome”.

This being said, it can be used for multiple tendinopathies, exertional leg pain and even apophysitis (stress/injury to muscle/tendon attachment in children) such as that of Osgood-Schlatter’s.

Medial tibial stress syndrome is really a low grade stress reaction in the tibia that is typically the result of torsional (twisting) forces as the foot, ankle and leg make contact with the ground, ultimately causing a very low grade stress response (the precursor to a stress fracture).

So when its put like that, we’re dealing with a few different potential diagnoses… so if the diagnoses are different, surely the treatment has to be too? Let’s look at metatarsalgia…

Metatarsalgia

Metatarsalgia, when the word is broken down means “pain in the forefoot”. It doesn’t include toe pain, although the pain can radiate into the toes.

Metatarsalgia can be the result of inflamed joints, overloading of tendons, structural anomalies, arthritic changes or swollen, inflamed or trapped nerves. All of these things can cause foot pain, but the treatment for the specific condition should need to be different for each problem.

Arthritis

Arthritis is a highly generic term but in reality has a very specific meaning which varies on context.

There are various types of arthritis – osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis etc, but quite often a diagnosis of arthritis may be made based off of an x-ray due to a narrowing of the joint spaces – which is actually typical in a huge proportion of the population who are “over a certain age”.

That said, the presence of arthritic changes do not necessarily mean that pain is guaranteed; in fact, there are a huge number of people walking or even running around whose knees are “bone on bone” with minimal or no pain. Equally there are a huge number of people who have joint pain but an x-ray examination shows no signs of that dreaded “wear and tear”.

There is a real paradigm shift going on within healthcare where we are concerned about the language we use and what that language means for our patients.

Equally, there is general misdiagnosis being made by those less experienced in diagnosing foot pain, and as a result I see many patients who go through life suffering with their feet for years until they get the correct diagnosis.

Always make sure that you get a diagnosis when you see a clinician and are not given a generic condition such as shin splints or metatarsalgia… 

About Jeremy Ousey MSc MCPod

Jeremy Ousey  is an HCPC registered Podiatrist and CASE qualified sonographer.

Having worked in podiatric surgical units, physiotherapy and multi-disciplinary practices, he takes a multi-faceted and patient-centred approach to care. With a bachelors in Podiatry, postgraduate degrees in podiatric sports medicine and medical ultrasound and a masters in the theory of podiatric surgery he allows evidence to guide his treatment plans.

Jeremy lectures on heel pain, extra-corporeal shockwave therapy, musculoskeletal examination, treatment of the foot and ankle including management of ankle sprains and verruca needling.

His interests are in the surgical management of skin lesions, nail surgery, musculoskeletal and biomechanical evaluation, acute and chronic sports injuries, tendinopathies, diagnostic ultrasound and surgical management of foot and ankle pathology

If you would like any more information or to book an appointment with Jeremy then please call Maidenhead Podiatry & Chiropractic Clinic on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

(Radial) Shockwave Therapy (SWT)

(Radial) SHOCKWAVE Therapy (SWT)

Radial Shockwave is a tried, tested, and well-researched treatment used in physiotherapy since the 1990s. It has gained popularity due to its effectiveness and application across a wide range of professions.

What would you use it for?

SWT is used by both our podiatrists and our chiropractors to treat a variety of conditions including those listed below. The list isn’t exclusive:

  • Heel pain – Plantar fasciitis
  • Shoulder pain
  • Tennis elbow – lateral epicondylitis
  • Golfer’s elbow – medial epicondylitis
  • Heel spur
  • Hip pain
  • Rotator cuff – calcifying tendonitis
  • Jumper’s knee – quadriceps tendonitis
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Chronic tendinopathy including Achilles tendonitis

How does it work?

Shockwaves are transient acoustic waves which uniquely transmit high energy peaks used to both disintegrate and heal.

Shockwave Therapy is supported by numerous clinical studies attesting to its healing and reparative effects on tissue with over 80% success in relieving symptoms and reducing or eliminating pain.

SWT is tested and approved by physicians all over the world and used from out-patient clinics to amateur sportspeople to Olympic athletes. Also is used in rehabilitation, podiatry, chiropractic, physiotherapy, orthopaedics, veterinary medicine, aesthetics, and dermatology.

Medical effects

The high energy peak acoustic waves generated by SWT interact with tissue stimulating the medical effects of accelerating tissue repair and cell growth, reducing pain, and improving range of movement.

Some of the independent and combined effects of SWT are:

  • Capillary micro-ruptures in tendon and bone trigger repair processes leading to the creation of new blood vessels reversing chronic inflammation by increasing mast cell activity
  • Collagen production is stimulated by accelerated procollagen synthesis
  • Breaking down of calcium build-up in calcific disorders
  • Dispersion of pain mediators
  • Trigger point release.

Frequently asked questions

Will Shock Wave Therapy help me?

Most people experiencing chronic pain have unsuccessfully tried other treatments. Over 80% of the same people worldwide report SWT has helped resolve their condition.

How long does it take?

The application of SWT within your appointment is normally completed in around five minutes.

Does it hurt?

Depending on the level of pain already being experienced in the area to be treated there may be some discomfort. Treatments normally last less than five minutes meaning that any discomfort is tolerable but the intensity can be varied during the session to suit patient preference.

How many treatments will I need?

This varies depending on the nature of the condition being treated and the response of the patient. Effects are cumulative, typically more than one but fewer than six visits with relief normally experienced from the first visit onwards.

Will there be any soreness afterwards?

Sometimes there may be some tenderness for a short period but nothing intolerable or limiting.

Is there anything I can’t do following treatment?

It is sensible to avoid physical exertion for a couple of days following treatment to allow healing to take place.

If you would like more information or to book an appointment with one of our podiatrists or chiropractors please call 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

Biomechanics and musculoskeletal assessment – a guest blog by Jeremy Ousey MSc MCPod

Biomechanics and musculoskeletal assessment

As part of working in private practice I regularly visit online forums for patients with common conditions – such as plantar fasciitis, Morton’s neuroma and shin splints.

I frequently read statements similar to “my friend said I need a biomechanics assessment” or “you need to go to the musculoskeletal clinic” or “find someone to do a musculoskeletal assessment”.

Great buzz words that sound impressive and potentially complicated – but what do they actually mean? What is involved?

As a professional who does both musculoskeletal and biomechanical assessments I know what they mean to me, but what do they mean to my patients?

Certainly, when your pain is a mystery and it isn’t getting better, you need to see someone who has a special interest and intimate understanding of the form and function of the body. It can sound like there’s some mystical excitement and curiosity about the process but these assessments can provide the answer to your problems.

What is the difference between musculoskeletal and biomechanical?

Musculoskeletal assessments

These are primarily focussed on the diagnosis and treatment of a condition.

Your clinician will identify the region of the body affected and then palpate (manually explore) the structures in that area to see if they can reproduce the pain. Once identified, and depending on the level of pain, they can then test the joints, muscles and tendons supporting it to see how normal function has been affected.

Musculoskeletal assessment typically involves taking a clinical history, clinical assessment with palpation, clinical tests and may utilise diagnostic tests such as imaging, injections and trial interventions.

Conditions that are likely to benefit most from a musculoskeletal assessment are:

  • Plantar fasciitis and heel pain
  • Morton’s neuroma and metatarsalgia
  • Achilles tendinitis

Biomechanical assessments

These are more movement focussed and look at the way that your appendage/limb/body moves and functions.

It doesn’t necessarily look for the specific anatomy causing pain but the interaction of your body as a whole, the idea being that more global information can be integrated to identify the mechanical source of your pain.

A biomechanical assessment may involve the use of gait and movement analysis and occasionally force plates and in-shoe pressure analysis (however this is rarely required). Conditions that lend themselves to biomechanical assessments are:

  • Shin pain (shin splints)
  • Recurrent stress fractures
  • Tendon pain when running
  • Knee pain
  • Hip pain
  • Arthritis

When is each used?

This is where science and art meet.

Musculoskeletal assessment tends to be used to inform the need for a biomechanical assessment.

The musculoskeletal assessment looks to present a diagnosis for the pain, identify what may be related to and causing that pain, and then to strengthen or offload associated structures reducing pain and promoting healing.

Biomechanical assessment focuses in on the movements of the body and how they might cause pain.

Biomechanical assessment is most effective when one gets the same recurring pain that is not due to lifestyle choices or where the pain that you get is not enough to stop the activities you enjoy (such as running) but is enough to reduce that enjoyment.

What is the outcome of each assessment type?

Well, the outcomes can be quite similar. The recommendation following either assessment can include

  • Semi-bespoke or prescribed bespoke orthotics
  • Rehabilitative stretches and exercises.
  • Footwear advice or modifications
  • Prescription medication
  • Advice on taping and braces
  • Gait re-training.

Does it matter which assessment you book for?

Only if the clinic you go to labels them differently, however the clinician that you see should be able to perform both and direct your appointment as required.

It tends to be that the majority of people have an appointment that combines both, depending on time. This allows for components of each to be used as is necessary.

My advice however would be that starting with an initial consultation with a specialist and then allowing them to guide you in the direction will give you the best results.

About Jeremy Ousey MSc MCPod

Jeremy Ousey  is an HCPC registered Podiatrist and CASE qualified sonographer.

Having worked in podiatric surgical units, physiotherapy and multi-disciplinary practices, he takes a multi-faceted and patient-centred approach to care. With a bachelors in Podiatry, postgraduate degrees in podiatric sports medicine and medical ultrasound and a masters in the theory of podiatric surgery he allows evidence to guide his treatment plans.

Jeremy lectures on heel pain, extra-corporeal shockwave therapy, musculoskeletal examination, treatment of the foot and ankle including management of ankle sprains and verruca needling.

His interests are in the surgical management of skin lesions, nail surgery, musculoskeletal and biomechanical evaluation, acute and chronic sports injuries, tendinopathies, diagnostic ultrasound and surgical management of foot and ankle pathology

If you would like any more information or to book an appointment with Jeremy then please call Maidenhead Podiatry & Chiropractic Clinic on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

Over doing the Gardening? Top 10 tips from your Chiropractor to take care of your back

How gardening affects your back

With lockdown anyone who has a garden has been spending much more of their copiously available free time making them look the best they have for years.

As a nation, we love our gardens and spend a considerable amount of time and money on them.  As we rush to get those essential jobs done, there is a risk that we may end up injuring ourselves, especially our back.

What everyone wants is to be fit and healthy enough to sit in their garden and enjoy the fruits of their labour come summer time, so here are some helpful tips from our Principal Chiropractor, Rebecca from Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic clinic:

What can I do? – Top ten tips –

  1. Dress appropriately –

    Don’t wear clothes that are tight or constrict your movement.

  2. Gardening is like any other exercise, you need to warm up first –

    Don’t go straight into heavy garden work, start off with lighter jobs first, this will lessen the chance of muscle strain.

  3. Don’t twist again –

    If you have to use a ladder for any of your gardening tasks, make sure you are always facing it. Rather than lean or reach, move the ladder regularly, always keep your shoulders, hips and knees pointing in the same direction and make sure the ladder is firmly and safely planted in position. If possible, have someone else standing there to keep an eye on things.

  4. Clever pruning –

    Get as close as possible to the things you are pruning; avoid overstretching to reach the area you are dealing with and invest in some long handled secateurs to reach plants and bushes that are beyond your normal reach.

  5. Digging deep –

    When digging, try not to bend or twist during the movement and alternate the foot you use to drive the spade into the ground.

  6. Raking –

    is best achieved with short movements; don’t reach out too far.

  7. Potting/planting –

    Use a mat and kneel when doing close weeding work, planting out or when potting up your plants, it is much better to do this at a table.

  8. Take a break –

    Vary your activity; spend no more than 20-30 minutes on any one thing and take regular breaks.

  9. Be clever with the paving –

    If laying a patio keep the slab close to your body and bend your knees.  It is sometimes better to bend one knee rather two, as your supporting leg gives you a position of strength and if using railway sleepers, two people will probably be needed.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

  10. Plan ahead –

    If you are planning a trip to the local DIY store and buying heavy items, such as cement or gravel, buy smaller bags rather than one big bag as they are easier and safer to carry. Shovel the contents of large bags straight into smaller containers or wheelbarrow from the back of the car.  If you are having items delivered, have them unloaded as close to where you need them as possible. This will save the effort of moving them again and a specialist garden trolley might be worth investing in to move these sorts of materials around, especially so if you have lots of patio pots to move.

Our Chiropractors

Rebecca Rees, BSc and Lucy Steel BSc MSc DC have over forty years of experience between them, are members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) and are registered with the General Chiropractic Council (GCC).

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Chiropractors, call – 01628 773588 and speak to one of our receptionists or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk. 

Visit: www.maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk/treatments/chiropractic for more information on Chiropractic. How it works and what it can do for you.

Need help with your feet or back – use our search bar.

Use our search bar the find what you are looking for

Many people visit our website for help or information on Podiatry or Chiropractic.

Both Podiatrists and Chiropractors offer a range of treatments and skills to benefit their patients but sometimes all you need is to be informed.

Below we describe what Podiatry and Chiropractic are and explain many of the treatments and services we offer but if you know what you are looking for then use the search bar in the top right hand corner of the screen.

A large part of what we provide for patients is help, advice and education and this website contains information on definition, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of conditions and all can be accessed through the search bar.

It doesn’t matter if you are looking for something specific or just curious. Give it a go. Find what you are looking for in our education pages and previous blogs. Click on the search bar.

Podiatry

Podiatry is defined as the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders; however, we assess, diagnose and treat from the knee down. We also treat warts on hands.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic is the management consists of a wide range of manipulative techniques designed to improve the function of joints, relieve pain and ease muscle spasm.

Chiropractors don’t only treat backs and can help with any soft-tissue or structural issues.

What is Podiatry?

Podiatry like many health care professions has general practitioners and specialists.

A general practitioner will treat anything from corns to verrucas and from plantar fasciitis or heel pain to ingrown toenails. We are all licenced to use local anaesthetic, perform minor surgeries such as ingrown nail removal and dispense antibiotics, if and where appropriate.

We provide vascular assessment and diabetic screening as a matter of course when requested or required. We have Podiatrists with special interests in areas such as diabetic care and biomechanical assessment and gait analysisGait analysis includes being filmed on a treadmill followed where appropriate by prescription of custom moulded orthotics together with an integrated exercise and rehabilitation program.

Seven Podiatrists and two Chiropractors trained in using the latest treatment and cutting-edge technology for a range of common conditions.

Cutting edge technology

Shockwave, which is a percussive mechanical treatment for chronic, or long-term, soft tissue pain such as heel pain, Achilles pain, hip pain and of course plantar fasciitis although it can be used anywhere in the body. It is used by both Podiatrists and Chiropractors

We were one of the first clinics in the country to use Swift, a microwave generator for the treatment of verrucas. We also offer salicylic acid, freezing and needling.

We offer all general foot care too including fungal nails, athlete’s foot, splits, fissures and infections. We also provide foot care in nursing and care homes as well as a domiciliary/home visiting service.

Contact us

Hopefully you have found what you are looking for but just in case you haven’t, give us a call on 01628 773588 and let us educate you. To find us follow the map and directions or put SL6 5FH into your sat nav.

We have our own free car park directly outside the clinic. Our premises are disabled friendly with no door thresholds and easy access throughout the ground floor. Let us know if you have any special requirements.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment give us a call on 01628 773588, and speak to one of our friendly receptionists or arrange a call back from one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors.

And, we will of course cut your toenails too.

Feet and pregnancy

How your feet change during pregnancy

How can you look after and care for your feet during pregnancy?

At Maidenhead Podiatry we find foot care during pregnancy is often overlooked with treatment only being sought towards the end of term, and frequently only because feet can no longer be reached.

Anti-natal classes provide lots of information and education about the changes to your body during pregnancy but they rarely include the changes that can take place with your feet     

Why do the feet change?

Pregnancy means many changes in a woman’s body and there are common changes that develop over the nine month term. Over the course of a pregnancy the body produces increasing amounts of the hormone relaxin.

Relaxin is a hormone produced during pregnancy by the ovaries and placenta with important effects in the female reproductive system in preparation for childbirth, including relaxing the ligaments in the pelvis to facilitate birth.

The action of relaxin on the soft tissue support structures of the feet combined with gradual weight gain can lead to foot pain as ligaments in the feet relax contributing to changes including pain and broadening of the foot.

Changes to the shape of the feet during pregnancy are often permanent.

This means that your favourite shoes may not fit your any more once you hear the pitter patter of tiny feet.

How do feet change?

A woman’s centre of gravity moves forward during pregnancy due to the natural pregnancy weight gain in the area of the pelvis and abdomen.

This leads to a new weight-bearing stance and often changes the way you walk, adding pressure in the hips, knees and feet. Often a simple set of orthotics can bring relief and make life easier but professional guidance is recommended.

Other common foot problems experienced by pregnant woman are over- pronation (rolling the foot inwards), odema (swelling), and the build up of hard skin (callous) or corns as a direct consequence of increased pressure and friction.

This can lead to pain in the heel, inner arch, or the ball-of-foot, often worse in the mornings on rising or after periods of rest such as sitting and having a coffee.

Many women may also experience leg cramping and varicose veins largely due to weight gain.

Because of this, it is important to learn more about foot health during pregnancy to help make this nine month period more comfortable.

What can you do and what can we do for you?

Some of the changes are inevitable but there are things you can do to accommodate your feet and make them more comfortable including –

  • put your feet ‘up’ when you can
  • wear shoes that allow for the changes
  • avoid heels
  • avoid flat shoes – a modest heel will be most comfortable
  • use foot cream regularly to keep the skin supple
  • visit a podiatrist for general footcare and nail cutting

A visit to a podiatrist will ensure you are doing the best to care for your feet and you will be given advice on how to continue that care before and after pregnancy.

At Maidenhead Podiatry we can treat and tidy the feet removing hard skin and callus and trimming and burring the nails. We can also give advice on bio-mechanical and gait changes and foot wear choices.

In addition, one of our Chiropractors, Lucy Steele‘s passion lies in the care of pregnant women, babies and children, and most of her post-graduate training has been in these areas. So, if back and/or pelvic pain is your problem Lucy will be pleased to help..

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, or Chiropractors call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01629 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

What is a Podiatrist?

What is a Podiatrist and what can they do for me?

This article will guide you through the many and varied aspects of Podiatry and help you find the foot care that suits you best. To assist in stopping the development of preventable foot problems and advise you in self care.

To offer a better understanding of the foot care options available to an individual we have split this blog into sections starting with the simplest or self care and escalating to the most complex or podiatric surgery as an end point.

  • Self care and footwear

 

Not everyone needs to become a patient. Many foot conditions can be safely and appropriately managed with the right equipment, skills and confidence.

Many foot health advice leaflets are available through the NHS and the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists and your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

Poor choices in footwear can cause significant foot problems and seeking and following advice to make good choices of appropriate footwear can prevent development of new conditions, aggravation of existing ones and prevention of falls. Again, your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

  • Footcare

Simple footcare is defined as nail cutting and skin care including the tasks that healthy adults would normally carry out as part of their daily personal hygiene routine.

Of course this doesn’t apply to everyone but it is an important aspect of footcare that ensures many individuals check their feet regularly while still mobile and pain free.

For those who do attend clinic regularly for simple footcare, examination of the feet during a routine appointment acts as an early detection system ensuring prompt intervention and prevention of developing more serious foot health problems.

PODIATRY

  • Core Podiatry
  • Nail surgery
  • Warts and verrucas
  • Fungal nails
  • Long term and neurological conditions

 

Core Podiatry is defined as ‘the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of common and more complex lower limb pathologies associated with toe nails, soft tissues and the musculo-skeletal system with the purpose of sustaining and improving foot health. (Farndon 2006).

The main foot conditions affecting older people (as opposed to children) requiring core podiatry are -nail problems, corns, callus, toe deformities, and falls prevention.

These conditions can be managed successfully by Podiatrists in the NHS and Private practice using a range of treatments including sharp debridement (scalpel), pharmacology (creams, tablets, steroid injection) and therapies (often in conjunction with footwear advice and and prescription of orthoses where appropriate0.

Although the call for Nail surgery is small – approximately 8 per 1000 GP patients – there is certainly a need for an effective, non-recurring treatment.

Since the 1970s partial or total nail avulsion has become a standard Podiatry procedure where part (the sides) or all of the nail are removed painlessly to the nail bed under local anaesthetic to resolve recurring problems with ingrown nails.

The likelihood of regrowth is reduced to almost zero (0.5%) with the application of  phenol to the nail bed.

Warts and verrucas are small skin growths caused by the human papilloma virus. Verrucas are warts on the feet, common in children and although harmless they can be painful.

Most verrucas will clear up without treatment within two years but there are numerous treatments available through your Podiatrist including

Fungal nails are very difficult to treat successfully. There are numerous topical applications available as well as GP only prescribed oral medication. Your Podiatrist will discuss your best options and agree a treatment plan.

Long term and neurological conditions include conditions such as Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke and Parkinson’s and a Podiatrist’s management often involves management and prevention of potential escalation of foot problems.

Core podiatry is essential in maintaining the integrity of the feet of people whose medical condition places them at risk of developing complex problems.

Falls prevention. Foot problems in older people are often associated with impaired balance and mobility and where there is a history of multiple falls there are usually more foot issues.

The existence of a corn, bunion or poor footwear choices are often at play and podiatry intervention can moderate the risks.

ORTHOTICS

  • Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision
  • Podopaediatrics
  • Sports injuries
  • Footwear

Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision. Bio-mechanics and bio-mechanical assessment are an essential part of podiatry provision and the discussion of findings and correction of underlying issues with orthoses can have positive implications across the breath of podiatry services.

Many patients present with musculo-skeletal pain caused by bio-mechanical problems which can involve foot, knee, hip and lower back affecting gait (the way they walk).

Often the most cost effective and appropriate treatment is the provision of orthoses (specialist insoles) which modify and correct the bio-mechanical problem.

There are a number of different orthoses that can be prescribed by your Podiatrist depending on presenting condition and patient need. Orthoses range from a simple heel raise or cushioned insole to specific complex custom devices.

Podopaediatrics focuses on provision of Podiatry for children. This ranges from treatment of warts and verrucas to early identification of foot deformities. From gait assessment to prescription of orthoses.

Sports injuries often occur due to abnormal rotation and deformation of joints and/or muscles. Podiatrists target improvement and resolution through bio-mechanical assessment and prescription of orthoses combined with strengthening exercises and footwear.

Footwear choices can directly affect foot conditions. Podiatrists offer advice from correct choices when buying shoes to measuring for custom made footwear depending on requirement.

SPECIALIST PODIATRY

– relates mainly to long term conditions and may or may not be provided within a general podiatry clinic.

  • Diabetes
  • Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders
  • Dermatology
  • Advanced technology

Diabetes care is one of the basic provisions of any Podiatry practice and your podiatrist can offer regular foot health assessment as part of good diabetic control and patient education.

Early detection of foot problems can ensure correct management and reduce the likelihood of critical long term changes.

Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) increase the need for a range of basic foot care services. Up to 90% of people with RA have some kind of foot involvement sometimes leading to the formation of callus corns and occasionally ulceration.

Early Podiatric intervention can improve long term outcomes.

Dermatology can be considered part of core Podiatry as many of the common skin problems seen on the feet are amenable to Podiatric treatment. From tinea pedis (athlete’s foot) to melanoma.

From verrucas to cellulitis you can ask your Podiatrist for advice.

Advanced technology is becoming more a part of day to day Podiatry provision. At Maidenhead Podiatry we use Swift – a microwave treatment – for verrucas, Shockwave for chronic soft tissue pain and Cryopen for freezing warts and verrucas.

EXTENDED SCOPE PRACTICE

Podiatrists who work in extended scope practice usually work in the NHS although they can be available in larger private practices and have undertaken additional training in their clinical areas  and may actively engage in the following –

  • non-medical prescribing
  • requesting blood tests
  • requesting scans
  • interpretations of test results
  • injection therapy
  • advanced vascular investigations

PODIATRIC SURGERY

Podiatric surgery is surgical treatment of the foot and associated structures carried out by a Podiatric Surgeon often as a day case and under a local anaesthetic.

In Conclusion good foot health has a fundamental link to health and well being. Poor foot health can have a significant impact on mobility, independence, and quality of life.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our experienced Podiatrists then give us a call today and make an appointment on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk and help lay the foundations of a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

 

Foot in vice

Why do I have pain in the arch and big toe?

What is the cause of my arch and big toe pain?

At Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic, our Podiatrists are often asked about foot pain located in the inner long arch or inside of the foot. The pain often associated with pain in the large/big toe joint. It can also radiate up the leg.

When do I get the pain?

When exercising, the pain often doesn’t come on straight away, but can develop some time after starting. What can be happening, halfway through a round of golf or some miles into a walk, is that the small supporting muscles of the foot become fatigued. It may come on more rapidly with high impact exercise such as running. Inflammation may be involved meaning that the pain worsens the day following exertion.

Where do I get the pain?

Pain or discomfort can manifest along the inside of the foot or the inner longitudinal arch. It can also be associated with pain the base of the big toe and into the joint.

Because the discomfort of the foot is usually due to mechanical changes this can refer to compensation pain up the leg and into the knee, hip, or back.

Why do I get the pain?

If you ‘overpronate’ it causes medial or inward rotation of the lower leg, which can cause stress at the knee, misalignment of the hips, and resultant lower back pain. The degree of ‘pronation’ can vary from person to person and used to be known as ‘flat feet’ although the actual cause is more complex. As the muscle fatigue, this allows the arch to over-extend further stressing the support tissues and increasing discomfort.

Think of your feet as the ‘foundation’ for the rest of the body. Ensuring your feet are correctly aligned allows the rest of the kinetic chain or biomechanical relationship between the feet and the rest of the body to function efficiently. Big toe joint pain can be due to a number of reasons including inflammation, arthritis, and poorly fitting shoes.

What can I do about it?

What is most important with any foot pain is to ensure a correct diagnosis. This ensures targeted and appropriate treatment. This starts with a bio-mechanical assessment.

The assessment focuses on structure, alignment, strength, and starts with the foot. This includes pelvis, hips, knees, feet and their relationship, as pain in one area can result in or cause weakness or a structural problem somewhere else.

A biomechanical assessment is essential where there is a pain in the feet or lower limbs but no cause has so far been established. Sometimes simple recommendations on footwear can make a huge difference especially sports shoes. Simply tying shoelaces properly can dramatically increase the support offered to the foot by a shoe. There are many different ways to lace a shoe. For ideas and a bit of fun, click here for lacing ideas.

Pain in the large toe can be associated with this but can also be due to shoe pressure on the inner edge of the apex of the toe.

Buy shoes that have a square toe box to reduce this pressure.

What can we do about it?

Podiatrist Jeremy Ousey has a special interest in bio-mechanics There are numerous choices following a biomechanical assessment. The outcome of the assessment determines the appropriate treatment. If the mechanics of the foot are contributing to injury or pain, orthotics or custom made insoles are prescribed, moulded from a foam impression of the feet.

The orthotics are prescribed in conjunction with exercises and a carefully constructed rehabilitation plan. Footwear is also considered and recommendations made.

Topical treatments such as Shockwave can be very effective in the treatment of foot and lower limb pain.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with Jeremy  Ousey call 01628 773588 or e-mail  info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

In our lifetime we walk over 100,000 miles! Are you ready?

In an average lifetime, it is estimated that we walk about 100,000 miles / 160,000 km.

Just think about that for a moment. One hundred thousand miles! At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are often asked “how does walking affect my feet?”

What are the benefits?

Walking helps the ligaments, tendons, and muscles in our feet to work more efficiently and helps maintain suppleness and flexibility. Walking at a brisk pace for regular exercise helps condition your body and improves overall cardiovascular health in the same way as running and jogging. However, compared with running, walking carries a significantly lower risk of injury.

What can I do?

So even if your job involves sitting in the office or at home, try to get up and walk briskly for at least 30 minutes every day. Consult your Podiatrist if you start to develop any pain when walking, or consider a visit before embarking on a new walking program.

Feet are adaptable and will withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you enjoy walking, it’s important to wear the right footwear, which doesn’t damage your feet.

What about footwear?

The key to keeping your feet healthy and comfortable, regardless of the type of walking you do, is wearing properly fitting shoes or boots.

When buying walking shoes, try several different brands, styles, and most importantly, sizes. Remember, your feet can expand as much as half a size during the day, so buy shoes in the afternoon or early evening when your feet are at their largest. This will help protect them as they expand during your long walks. Also, wearing the same type of socks when fitting shoes that you wear when you walk will help you choose the right shoe and once you have made your purchase – take care of them.

What else should I think about?

If you are going on a long walk, prepare well ahead. Wear your shoes for a ‘trial walk’ and build up the distance gradually; don’t try to complete the London Marathon on your first trip! It’s also a good idea to pay a visit to your local HCPC – registered podiatrist who will be able to give advice and treat any corns, callus, or any foot issue you may have.

Take some first aid supplies, like plasters or antiseptic cream, on your walking trip in case of accidents. It’s also a good idea to put rub Vaseline/petroleum jelly between your toes to prevent chafing.

So, let’s get started

Begin at a slow pace and gradually increase the speed of your walk. This will give the muscles, bones, tendons, and ligaments that make up your feet the chance to get gradually used to the activity. If you experience any discomfort or foot pain, then it may be an indication that something is wrong. In many cases, early diagnosis can prevent a small injury from becoming a larger one. You are never too old to start!

Here are 10 tips to bear in mind:

  • When buying shoes, wear the same socks that you will wear when walking.
  • Try on at least four or five pairs of shoes.
  • Don’t walk too far in new shoes.
  • Put on and lace both shoes of each pair and walk around for a minute or two.
  • Good foot care is essential in keeping your feet comfortable and fatigue and injury-free.
  • If you experience any sort of foot pain, consult a Podiatrist.
  • Build your distance up gradually.
  • Before and after you walk, go through a warm-up and stretching routine.
  • Look after your feet and you too will cover at least 100,000 miles!

For more information on walking or any other foot care issue, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, please call 01628 773588, or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Why is my back hurting?

At Havelock Chiropractic, our Chiropractors are often asked, ‘why is my back hurting?

Back pain is often thought to be due to “over-doing it”, however, have you ever wondered why so many people injure themselves with simple actions like picking up a pencil or getting out of a chair?

It is important to understand that prolonged sedentary activity can be as bad as excessive unaccustomed exercise and extremely detrimental to the spine.

The Chiropractors at the Havelock Chiropractic encourage you to ‘listen to your body’.

  • It is important to note when you are in pain, how long does it last and how frequently does it return?
  • Is it worse in the morning, through the day or at night?
  • What is the location of the pain, and what is the quality of your pain (ache, cramp, sharp, shooting, burning etc.)
  • What aggravates it and what relieves it?

You may be experiencing other symptoms, such as pins and needles/tingling, cramp, stiffness and loss of motion, headaches, nausea, fatigue, irritability or vertigo, for example. You should not ignore these, be proactive and remember to tell your Chiropractor as soon as possible.

For more information or to book an appointment call us on 01628 773588 or e-mail on info@havelockchiropractic.co.uk