Tag Archives: shoes

Buying new school shoes online? How to measure your children’s feet accurately .

Have your children outgrown their school shoes?

You can measure your children’s feet yourself at home. It doesn’t matter if they are six or sixteen (or sixty), correct fit is important for anyone at any age. Read on.

When children’s feet grow, they grow quickly.

In a child’s first three to four years, their feet grow about two sizes a year, although by the time they are school age, at five years old, it has slowed to around a size a year. Of course, rate of increase varies from child to child.

You can’t currently have feet measured professionally because shoe shops are currently closed and ordering online has become a necessity.

You can take the guesswork out of it by taking measurements at home. Here is how to do it.

It is essential to get your children’s shoe size right first time.

Shoes being too big can be as bad for your children’s feet as being too small.

Of course, every child’s foot is unique, but a well-fitting shoe not only protects foot development, keeping growing feet comfortable and healthy but gives children the confidence as they work and play.

How does home measurement work?

All you need is a printable foot gauge. Click here – and follow the instructions.

  • make sure your printer is set to 100% and not to scale
  • once it has printed use a ruler to check it’s correct
  • place the paper gauge on a flat, hard floor
  • ensure the heel is level with the ‘base line’
  • make sure your child is standing with both feet taking even weight
  • measure both feet, it is common for one foot to be a bit bigger than the other
  • note down the size to their largest toe (this isn’t always the big toe).
  • repeat on the other foot.
  • for the width, cut the width measure off the right side and wrap it around the thickest part of the foot – diagonally from the ball joint on their little toe to the ball joint on their big toe
  • buy a shoe with approximately 2cm growth room

If you don’t have a printer, you can use a piece of A4 paper and a ruler/tape to get the measurements.

What type of shoe should you choose for school?

With children recently spending so much time at home and no time at school they will have been wearing all sorts of shoes, wellingtons, crocs or no shoes at all.

It will be quite a contrast but they will benefit from leather shoes that are supportive, correctly measured, and that fasten securely to the their foot.

It is also a good idea for them to wear them around the house for a few hours in the days leading up to them going back to school.

How to check if your child’s shoes fit correctly?

Once you receive the new shoes – try them on, then –

  • do the check in the afternoon as feet can swell as the day passes
  • fastened them
  • make sure your child is standing
  • ensure the back of the foot is snugly against the heel of the shoe
  • press your thumb firmly down sideways on the front of your child’s shoe to see where their toes are
  • If you can’t feel the toe through the shoe, get your child to wiggle their foot
  • With the foot firmly against the back of the shoe there should be a gap of about 2cm or a thumbs width for growth
  • check the width is just right using a finger and thumb.
  • remember that sizes vary between brands.

Finally, give the shoe a tug as if trying to pull it off. If there is a little give, but it stays on then you know it is fitting correctly. In any case, your child will soon tell you if the shoe isn’t comfortable.

If you would like more information or an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, give us a call on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Wherever the beach, make sure your feet are ready!

 

British beach or foreign beach, make sure you are ready.

It is a strange time at the moment. After so long being told to stay at home we are finally seeing an easing of the lockdown restrictions and that means there is a strong prospect of us heading to the beach this summer.

Of course, we don’t know if it will be a British beach or a foreign one, but the preparation and the wish to look your best is the same.walking on a beach

The Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry have put together a number of summer foot-care tips, to help get your feet in shape for the beach or just a summer at home.

  1. Trim your toenails for summer 

    – Use proper nail clippers and cut straight across following the contour of the toe, not too short, and not down at the corners as this can lead to ingrown nails. File them, if it’s easier.

  2. Go barefoot

    – Go barefoot or wear open-toed sandals whenever you can in the hot weather (except when you’re in a communal shower or changing area) to help stop your feet getting sweaty and smelly.  Go bare foot as much as possible at home.  If you have diabetes, poor circulation or are taking anti-inflammatory drugs ask advice first from your Podiatrist.

  3. Forget flip-flops

    – Don’t be tempted to wear flip-flops all through the summer. They don’t provide support for your feet and can give you arch and heel pain if you wear them for too long. (Fit Flops, however do offer some degree of support).

  4. Change socks daily

    – If you have to wear socks in hot weather, change them once a day and choose ones that contain at least 70% cotton or wool to keep your feet dry and stop them smelling.

  5. Remove hard skin

    – Hard, cracked skin around the heels is very common in summer, often caused by open-backed sandals and flip-flops rubbing around the edge of the heel. Use a foot file or emery board (pumice stone is horribly unhygienic) to gently rub away the hard skin, then apply a rich moisturiser such as aqueous cream or E45 to soften the skin.

  6. Banish blisters –

    Blisters strike more often in hot weather and are caused by rubbing, especially between the toes if you’re wearing flip-flops with “thongs”. If you do get a blister, don’t put a plaster over it.  Leave it to dry out on its own.

  7. Buy shoes carefully

    – Always buy work shoes late in the afternoon. Shoes bought in the morning are often too small by the end of the day as your feet swell as the day passes.

  8. Ring the changes –

    Wear a variety of different sandals and shoes during summer to help prevent cracked heels, hard skin and blisters. Wear shoes with leather or Gortex uppers. Hard leather shoes retain more moisture than more porous softer leather shoes. In general natural materials such as cotton and wool are far better for your feet because natural fibres provide a “wicking” effect which absorbs moisture and keeps the feet cool as your perspiration rapidly evaporates. Better still, some man-made socks wick sweat away from the skin providing a constant dry layer next to the skin. Change your socks or hosiery at least every day and take spare socks in case it needs to be more often.

  9. Watch out for foot infections – 

    The floors of communal showers and changing rooms at open-air and hotel swimming pools are hot spots for infections such as athlete’s foot and verrucas. Don’t wander around public pools barefoot. Protect your feet by wearing flip-flops in the changing room and at the pool edge.

  10. Get help if you need it – 

    Basic hygiene and nail cutting should be all you need to keep your feet healthy. Wash feet every day and dry properly between the toes, especially after swimming or using the gym.

feet in the water on a beachThe best start is to to visit a professional. If you would like your feet examined, assessed and treated by one of our Podiatrists, call us for an appointment on – 01628 773588 or email – info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

If you would like more information about Poidiatry then visit – http://maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk/treatments/podiatry/

 

Snap-shots from the history of footwear

We are constantly being told of the importance of shoes and, more to the point, the importance of the right shoes.

It can be a dry subject so here are some fun facts, interesting snippets and snap-shots from the history of footwear.

The Ancient Egyptians used to paint the picture of their enemy on the sole of their shoe so that they stamped on them when they walked and today in parts of the Middle East, throwing your shoe at someone is considered a gross insult.

The Romans are thought to have been the first to make left and right shoes, previously both had been the same, and they coloured them according to rank.

In the thirteenth century shoe/boot makers were called ‘Cordwainers’, named after the fine, hard wearing goatskins that came from Cordova in Spain.

‘Cobblers’ at this time did not make shoes. They bought up old ones and re-made them for re-sale, the same materials being used repeatedly. Hence the term – ‘cobble something together.’

Although now seen as a sign of femininity and glamour – a pair of high heels was once an essential accessory for men.

The history of footwear is inextricably linked with the history of transport. In every century before the last two, the most common way of moving from one place to another was either walking or riding.

In previous centuries, horse-riding was almost exclusively a male pursuit and this had a profound effect on the design of men’s shoes. Men’s high heels helped keep the foot in the stirrup and helped control the horse during hard riding. They couldn’t be functional if the heel was too narrow or tapering, as it would tend to snap; and if they were too high, walking was difficult.

Therefore, the design was a response to practical need. They had to be dual-purpose, suitable for riding and convenient for walking. By the middle of the nineteenth century, improved coach design and development of the railways meant there was less demand for a boot primarily designed for riding and so the design changed again.

Some diminutive men through history also used them to make themselves appear taller, even the odd film star today.

During the same period surviving women’s shoes suggest they were not made to be worn outdoors. When women travelled, they went by coach or, in the seventeenth century, sedan chair.

Therefore, women’s high heels had little to do with practicality. Indeed, at the court of Louis 16th, women wore such extreme high heels that they could only walk with a stick and could not tackle stairs without assistance. 

Of course the shoes described were the preserve of the wealthy. For the majority of people, footwear was chosen for practicality. Boots that kept the water out and the warmth in. Shoes and boots that were worn until worn out, often passed down from the wealthy to their servants as long as they weren’t too elaborate.

Fashions also varied from country to country. One example is the way the french revolution swept away all fashion and fripperies. Shoes became plain flat and without heels. The fashions that would give even the most masculine man a strangely female gait were replaced by that allowed walking to be natural and easy for the first time in generations.

Today’s shoes are a progression and natural development of earlier styles and continue to change year on year.

‘Shoes can lift the spirits, delight the sole and give confidence to the insecure’. Colin McDowell – Shoes, Fashion and Fantasy

Shoes develop with contemporary fashion moods and designers play with scale, proportion, colour, texture and function. What is most important is that they are comfortable, supportive and fit for purpose.

If you would like more information or an appointment with one of our Podiatrists then call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588 or e-mail us on info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Choosing your baby’s first shoes

Choosing your baby’s first shoes is such an important purchase.

The Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry are often asked for advice on children’s foot wear and what to look for when buying their baby’s first shoes.

As parents know, most babies don’t stay in one place for very long.

What a fascinating place the world is, particularly if it’s all new to you……and then you learn to crawl.

First things first

 

By about four months most babies start to rock and roll, first from their side to their back, and back again.

Soon after they’ll start to lie with their upper body supported on one or both hands – all the better to see the world around them.

Next, they learn to sit.

At first, they can stay in place when you put them down for just a few seconds before tumbling back, but later they’ll be able to sit up for themselves as their muscles strengthen and coordination improves.

Babies then work out that by pushing down with hands to raise their upper body, they can pull themselves along.

Later, their legs join in too and then they’re off.

Crawling

At high speed too – they can crawl 400m in the time it takes you to drink a cup of tea.

Obviously not all babies are the same and some don’t crawl, instead they perform a rather curious bottom shuffling.

Don’t use a baby-walker – your baby will stand when they’re ready and baby-walkers won’t make it any sooner.

In fact, badly adjusted baby-walkers are thought to hinder development.

Cruising

“Cruising” comes between crawling and walking.

Having pulled themselves up on the furniture children slide their hands to one side, then their feet. This allows them to move their whole body.

To stay upright they will always keep either two hands and one foot or two feet and one hand in place.

At first they crawl when confronted with a gap between furniture.

However, as they grow they learn to cross by moving their feet into the gap and letting go to totter to the next support.

Walking

Between 9 and 18 months old, most children learn to walk, depending on development of muscular strength.

But don’t hurry them or become anxious – your child is an individual and will walk as soon as they are ready.

First steps on a very long road.

First shoes

As soon as your child can take a few steps unaided then they are ready for their first pair of real shoes.

When choosing your child’s first shoes try and find a shop with a trained fitter.

Then look for these features in the shoes you choose –

  • close cropped soles to prevent tripping
  • space for movement and growth built in
  • soft leather uppers for cool comfortable feet
  • light, flexible soles to aid development of walking
  • whole and half sizes and a choice of widths to find the correct fit
  • fully adjustable fastenings
  • padded ankle for protection and support

At this age most children learn to run and perform little standing jumps.

Once they reach this stage you will need shoes that can take some punishment and still look good.

Infant shoes need room to grow without sacrificing fit.

Toddler

As your child grows, you will pass many other milestones together. First birthday, first words, as well as other occasions.

While all this is happening your child’s feet and their walking continue to develop all the time.

By the time your child is a fully-fledged toddler they will clearly walk very differently from when they took those first steps.

Arms are no longer used for balance so they can be used to pick up (and throw down!) things that catch their eye.

Knees and feet now point forward as the hip joints are fully in place.

Ankles and knees now flex too, reducing the shock that leads to head movement and, in turn, tumbles.

However walking is still flat footed (which is what can make can make toddlers look clumsy) so light and flexible soles are still vital.

Don’t be concerned by their feet appearing ‘flat’ at this age as it is all part of  a developing foot.

If you would like any more information or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists call 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Foot in vice

Why do I have pain in the arch and big toe?

What is the cause of my arch and big toe pain?

At Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic, our Podiatrists are often asked about foot pain located in the inner long arch or inside of the foot. The pain often associated with pain in the large/big toe joint. It can also radiate up the leg.

When do I get the pain?

When exercising, the pain often doesn’t come on straight away, but can develop some time after starting. What can be happening, halfway through a round of golf or some miles into a walk, is that the small supporting muscles of the foot become fatigued. It may come on more rapidly with high impact exercise such as running. Inflammation may be involved meaning that the pain worsens the day following exertion.

Where do I get the pain?

Pain or discomfort can manifest along the inside of the foot or the inner longitudinal arch. It can also be associated with pain the base of the big toe and into the joint.

Because the discomfort of the foot is usually due to mechanical changes this can refer to compensation pain up the leg and into the knee, hip, or back.

Why do I get the pain?

If you ‘overpronate’ it causes medial or inward rotation of the lower leg, which can cause stress at the knee, misalignment of the hips, and resultant lower back pain. The degree of ‘pronation’ can vary from person to person and used to be known as ‘flat feet’ although the actual cause is more complex. As the muscle fatigue, this allows the arch to over-extend further stressing the support tissues and increasing discomfort.

Think of your feet as the ‘foundation’ for the rest of the body. Ensuring your feet are correctly aligned allows the rest of the kinetic chain or biomechanical relationship between the feet and the rest of the body to function efficiently. Big toe joint pain can be due to a number of reasons including inflammation, arthritis, and poorly fitting shoes.

What can I do about it?

What is most important with any foot pain is to ensure a correct diagnosis. This ensures targeted and appropriate treatment. This starts with a bio-mechanical assessment.

The assessment focuses on structure, alignment, strength, and starts with the foot. This includes pelvis, hips, knees, feet and their relationship, as pain in one area can result in or cause weakness or a structural problem somewhere else.

A biomechanical assessment is essential where there is a pain in the feet or lower limbs but no cause has so far been established. Sometimes simple recommendations on footwear can make a huge difference especially sports shoes. Simply tying shoelaces properly can dramatically increase the support offered to the foot by a shoe. There are many different ways to lace a shoe. For ideas and a bit of fun, click here for lacing ideas.

Pain in the large toe can be associated with this but can also be due to shoe pressure on the inner edge of the apex of the toe.

Buy shoes that have a square toe box to reduce this pressure.

What can we do about it?

Podiatrist Jeremy Ousey has a special interest in bio-mechanics There are numerous choices following a biomechanical assessment. The outcome of the assessment determines the appropriate treatment. If the mechanics of the foot are contributing to injury or pain, orthotics or custom made insoles are prescribed, moulded from a foam impression of the feet.

The orthotics are prescribed in conjunction with exercises and a carefully constructed rehabilitation plan. Footwear is also considered and recommendations made.

Topical treatments such as Shockwave can be very effective in the treatment of foot and lower limb pain.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with Jeremy  Ousey call 01628 773588 or e-mail  info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

How do you choose the right footwear?

At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are often asked, ‘how do you choose the right footwear?’

Keeping your feet healthy is only part of preventing foot problems, is also essential that you wear well-fitting shoes.

So it doesn’t matter if walking, dancing or pounding the pavements is your choice of exercise in 2010, The Society of Chiropodist and Podiatrists offers the following advice to help keep feet fighting fit.

Feet have a rough time of it; we demand a lot of them, they carry us the equivalent of five times around the earth in an average lifetime, and yet we give them less attention than they deserve and we rarely wear the best shoes for our feet.

In an average lifetime, we walk about 100,000 miles, which is tough on our feet. Yet our bodies were designed for moving – not standing still, so walking is good exercise for us and our feet.

Walking helps the muscles and ligaments in our feet to work more efficiently, helping keep them supple and flexible. So whether your job requires you to sit for extended periods, or work from home, try to get up and walk briskly for at least 30 mins every day.

Feet are adaptable and can withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you walk a lot it’s important to wear the correct footwear which won’t damage your feet.

Registered Chiropodists/podiatrists will be able to give advice on suitable footwear. They will be able to suggest suitable ‘warm up’ exercises to ease you gently into your chosen sport, and help prevent injury.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment, call 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.