Category Archives: Diabetic

Are your feet ‘summer ready’?

Summer is here and your feet need to be ready for action.

Now restrictions are lifting we are enjoying more freedom and holidays, even if they are in this country! The weather has generally been warm and sunny, and a walk on the beach in Britain is as good as a walk on a beach abroad.

If you are unsure how your feet can benefit, a great start is to visit to one of our Podiatrists for an assessment, trim and tidy. Get your feet ‘beach ready’!

Whether you need specialist care and advice, or simply removal of corns and callus, come and see us for a consultation. A general consultation can last up to half an hour and can include Doppler, sensation testing and general foot health checks.

We also offer gait analysis, musculo-skeletal assessment and bio-mechanical review as well as everything from verruca treatment to ingrowing toenails..

The blog below gives more information on who we are and what we do.

Have you ever thought about visiting a Podiatrist and wondered what they do?

Ever thought about visiting a Podiatrist and wondered what they do?

As the article suggests, a Podiatrist assesses and treats a wide variety of conditions below the knee. Anyone can benefit, from diabetics to someone who just wants their feet to look good on holiday.

It doesn’t matter if you aren’t going abroad this year, you still want to feel you can step out with confidence.Giveusacall.

Beauty is back

Once you have seen one of our experienced Podiatrists, we have some spectacular treatments to make sure you put your best foot forward for the upcoming season. Our beauty therapist, Carrieann, provides a range of treatments to compliment our Podiatry services.

For more information on the treatments provided by Carrieann, visit. https://skinsensations.co.uk/

Carrieann’s most popular foot treatments are  –

Luxury Pedicure

Treat your feet to some much-needed TLC with our luxury pedicure! Be whisked away from it all with a relaxing foot and leg massage and a deep exfoliation, plus a long soak in one of our massaging foot spas and finishing with a nail paint.

Medical Pedicure/Medi-ped

A medical pedicure – or medi-ped – is starts with a visit to a Podiatrist and ends with a visit to our beauty therapist.

Our medical pedicures are adapted to each client by our Podiatrist so they are tailor-made to suit your needs. You will receive a complete Podiatry treatment followed by all the wonders of our luxury pedicure (above)

Why do it?

Your feet feel good and you feel good. Sore feet can ruin your day, so why wait.

It doesn’t matter if you are walking miles on a costal path or sitting in the sun, relaxing with a good book,you want your feet to be at their best.

We cater for diabetics and a range of foot conditions. We are a Royal College of Podiatry accredited practice and we also offer home visits for those that require it.

Make an appointment

If you would like more information, to speak to one of our Podiatrists, or to make an appointment, call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

To make an appointment directly with Carrieann, call 01628 779909 and speak to a member of our friendly reception team.

Hot feet? How to relieve the heat.

We have now had several consecutive days with maximum recorded temperatures over 30 degrees centigrade.

Typical of the UK, the heat comes on quickly, with no smooth transition, and then we feel uncomfortable for days while we try to get used to it. And, of course, our feet can feel really hot and throbbing locked in shoes while we work.

What actually happens to your feet?

As temperatures soar, the quarter of a million sweat glands in your feet start working hard. The job of the sweat glands is to make the skin cooler but can leave it damp and a little whiffy. This is often accompanied with swelling.

One of the functions of your skin is temperature regulation. Blood vessels dilate to help heat escape and fluid floods the tissues causing the skin goes pink or red – erythema. If you have a job that involves standing or sitting for long periods, gravity encourages fluid to collect in the lowest point of the body  – your feet, helping to make them feel tired and achy.

Sweaty, swollen feet aren’t just uncomfortable – they also increase your risk of foot health issues, such as blisters, foot odour and athlete’s foot fungal infections.

The fungi and bacteria that cause foot odour just love these moist, warm and dark conditions come with a heat wave.

So, how do you look after your feet in a heatwave?

Simple, reliable ways to cool your feet

At the end of your working day, you get home and your feet are so hot and throbbing that they feel like they might explode. there are some simple choices using items that can easily be found in most households.

• A hot water bottle can be used to cool as well as heat. Fill it with water and crushed ice and sit with your feet on it like a cold cushion.

• No hot water bottle? A cold, damp towel draped over your feet can work wonders.

• If you can, get outside and put your feet up on a footstool. They’ll soon feel cooler and less swollen.

• Peppermint is a popular essential oil to add to a foot spray, with a lovely cooling effect.

• A nice bowl of cold water and ice also goes a long way towards making your feet feel better.

Keep  your feet comfortable

Comfortable feet aren’t something that just  happens, you need to put some work into it.

• Keep your feet clean – wash and thoroughly dry your feet morning and night. This removes or neutralises sweat and odour-causing bacteria and fungi.

• Use antiperspirant on your feet daily to reduce excessive sweating and odour.

• Wear ‘wicking’ socks and change them at least daily. These draw sweat away from the skin which is why they’ve long been favoured by runners.

• Choose footwear made to breathe and if you are at work, buy shoes for comfort, not for fashion.

It is typical of the UK as a nation to grumble about poor weather and then to complain loudly when it improves, but sore feet are no joke. If you are concerned that your foot pain may have a deeper cause, then give us a call. Your first visit includes a consultation, discussion of concerns and the construction of a treatment plan.

Consult a professional.

If you would like more specific advice, if you experience sweaty, smelly or uncomfortable feet, then the first step is to consult a professional for the best advice and a treatment plan.

If you would like more information or to speak to one of our Podiatrists, or to make an appointment, give us a call  on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Do you have tiny holes in the skin on the soles of your feet?

Punctate or pitted keratolysis

This is a condition characterised by multiple tiny holes on the top layer of the skin mainly on the soles of the feet. It can also be found between the toes, but usually affects pressure areas, such as the ball of the foot, heels and the pads of the toes.

Often it is accompanied with a distinctive smell.

What causes it?

Puncate or pitted keratolysis is thought to be caused by bacteria. Several species of bacteria are responsible including corynebacteria, Dermatophilus congolensisKytococcus sedentarius, actinomyces and streptomyces.

The small holes, or ‘pitting’ are due to the horny cells (stratum corneum) being destroyed by protease enzymes produced by the bacteria. This process is fed and exacerbated by moist conditions meaning that this condition is often found on sweaty feet.

The bad smell is due to sulfur compounds produced by the bacteria – thiols, sulfides and thioesters.

Who can develop it?

This condition is experienced more by men than women. Any profession where you are constantly on your feet and footwear is worn for extended periods makes the wearer prone to developing it. Examples are soldiers, farmers, industrial workers and fishermen but this list is by no means exclusive.

What is likely to make it worse?

This list isn’t exhaustive but these are some of the main influencers –

  • Hot, humid weather
  • Occlusive, fully enclosed footwear, such as rubber boots or vinyl shoes
  • Excessively sweaty feet (hyperhidrosis)
  • Thickened skin of the soles of the feet (keratoderma/hyperkeratosis)
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Aging
  • Immunodeficiency

What does it look and smell like?

Puncate keratolysis usually results in very smelly feet This is caused by infection of the soles of the feet. Either the forefoot or the heel or both become white with clusters of punched-out pits.

The appearance is clearer and more dramatic when the feet are wet, such as after a bath or shower, swimming or long periods in the same shoes.

It can affect the fingers but this is very rare. There is a variant where there are more diffuse or wide spread, red areas on the soles of the foot.

The key things to look for are –

  • Mainly affects the soles, forefoot, the heel and pads of toes or all three. Palms are very rarely infected.
  • Presents as  whitish skin surface with clusters of multiple, fine punched-out pits.
  • Pits can often join together to form larger, crater-like lesions.
  • A variant presents with diffuse red areas on the soles of the feet
  • Strong foot odour.

Why would you visit a Podiatrist?

The pits can present a striking and worrying appearance to the soles of the feet, but they don’t usually present with other symptoms such as pain. Occasionally, in chronic conditions, there  can be some itching and soreness associated on walking or standing.

The usual reason for concern is the strong smell that accompanies this condition.

A Podiatrist is trained to recognise this condition but if there is any doubt, skin scrappings and culture are possible to confirm which bacteria are involved.

How is it treated?

There are a number of topical anti-biotics and anti-septics that can be successfully applied, but these are normally only accessed through your GP.

Fucidic acid cream (or Fucidin) can be applied topically and if this fail, Clindamycin can be taken orally. Other medications are available and this would need to be discussed with your GP to decide the best treatment on an individual basis.

How can I prevent it or prevent it reoccurring?

Pitted keratolysis can recur quickly unless the feet are kept dry. the following are some ideas and steps to take to prevent that –

  • Wear boots for as little time as possible
  • Wear socks that allow effective absorption of sweat, ie cotton and/or wool
  • Wear open-toed shoes/sandals whenever possible
  • Wash feet with soap/detergent or antiseptic wash twice daily
  • Apply antiperspirant to the feet regularly
  • Do not wear the same shoes two days in a row allowing them to dry out
  • Nevershare footwear or towels with others.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, call 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Do I have hammer toes and can they be treated?

What is a toe deformity?

There are various types of smaller toe deformities and depending on shape are classified as hammer, clawed or retracted toes.

There are three small bones (phalanges) in each of your four smaller (lesser) toes. The bones are connected by ligaments, which dictate range of movement and prevent dislocation. Tendons connect muscle to bone within the foot and control movement and provide stability relative to the ground when walking.

Larger muscles and tendons within the leg move the toes. Toe deformities can occur when there is a muscle imbalance within the foot and the leg. Buckling of the toes can be due to external pressures from shoes and direct injury resulting in toe deformity. Inflammatory and neurological conditions can cause toe deformity as well.

What causes the problem?

As with bunions, there is no single cause of lesser (small) toe deformities. They are frequently caused by defective mechanical structure in the foot which can be a result of genetics; certain foot types pre-dispose development of toe deformities.

Changes to lesser toe shape are commonly due to pressure from shoes or the next toe which can result in painful hard skin forming. It is quite common to see corns and calluses around the tips of toes or on top of small toe joints.

Poorly fitting footwear tends to aggravate the problem, squeezing the forefoot, crowding the toes together and worsening the underlying condition, resulting in pain and deformity of the joint. As we get older, toe deformities may progress become more pronounced. Arthritis and trauma can also play a role.

Is it serious?

Many people have pronounced toe deformities that are painless, but can cause problems with footwear, while other, more subtle toe deformities that can be very painful. Although treatment can ease pain, only surgery can correct the deformity.

Sometimes, pressure from adjacent toes can lead a cascade effect resulting in further toe deformities and/or pain in the metatarsals (long bones in the forefoot). For example, when deformity of the small toes is made worse by increasing bunion changes.

Patients who have altered nerve or blood supply to their feet and are assessed as at risk of lower limb loss, often first present with ulcers on their smaller toes. Left untreated, seemingly small issues can progress rapidly to limb threatening problems.

Who gets it?

Anyone, but they tend to be more common in women, likely due to more restrictive footwear. Parents or grandparents have toe deformities, may make you more prone to developing them. Medical conditions such as diabetes or inflammatory arthritis may also lead to development of severe toe deformities as the disease develops.

How do I prevent toe deformities?

Wearing sensible shoes that fit well is a good start. Choose wider shoes that provide toes with room to move and keep your heel height to no more than 4cm. Consider the following –

  • If you do to wear heels, vary your heel heights from day to day, one day wearing low heels and the next day slightly higher heels
  • Avoid backless, high-heeled shoes.as they force your toes to claw as you walk
  • A shoe with a fastening over the instep holds the foot secure and stable reducing the need for you to try to stabilise your foot with your toes
  • With existing toe deformities, try to accommodate your toes by selecting shoes that have a wider/deeper toe-box

Your podiatrist may recommend the following:

  • Conservative or no treatment (you can elect to live with your toe problems)
  • Regular foot-care by a Podiatrist to reduce callus build-up
  • Use of foot cream and topical medication for associated problems
  • Splints, shields, off-loading devices, pads and shoe alterations/footwear advice
  • The opinion of a Podiatric Surgeon

Non-surgical treatments can help relieve symptoms but it is unlikely they can correct the underlying deformity. Your podiatric surgeon will evaluate the extent of the deformity and remodel the shape of your toes, allowing a greater chance of fitting inside an average shoe.

Surgery is complex and intricate as deformities of the small toes can occur in any one of the three joints in each toe and in any direction. There are numerous surgical options for toe deformities and an increasing number of new technologies in surgery for small joints.

The aim of surgery is to address the underlying cause of the deformity to prevent recurrence. As with all surgery, there are risks and complications, and it is important to balance any potential risk against perceived reward when considering foot surgery.

You should certainly consider getting an opinion about surgery or surgical options from a Podiatric Surgeon if you are in pain or experiencing progressing deformity.

When should I see a podiatric surgeon about it?

If you experience any foot care issues which do not resolve themselves naturally or through routine foot care, then ask your Podiatrist to refer you to a Podiatric Surgeon.

Your Podiatric Surgeon will discuss options in a shared decision-making process accounting for your presenting symptoms, age, activity level, occupation and medical history, in conjunction with appropriate imaging. This will help you to make an informed decision on what is best for you.

Podiatrists and Podiatric Surgeons are registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). You can check your professional is registered here.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, call 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

What is Diabetes?

At Maidenhead Podiatry we are frequently asked – what is diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic, potentially debilitating disease.

It occurs as a result of problems with the production and supply of a hormone called insulin.

Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by the islets of Langerhans which regulates the amount of glucose in the blood.

In type 1 diabetes the body either produces no or insufficient insulin and in type 2, or late onset diabetes, the body can’t use the insulin it produces effectively.

Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called insulin-dependant, immune-mediated or juvenile onset diabetes.

It is caused by an auto-immune reaction where the body’s defence system attacks the insulin producing cells.

The reason this happens isn’t understood but explains why the onset of diabetes often follows illness.

It can affect people of any age but usually occurs in children or young adults.

Type 1 diabetics need regular injections of insulin to control the level of glucose in their blood.

Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependant or late onset diabetes.

Generally speaking type 2 diabetics do not usually require insulin injections but instead control their blood glucose through diet, medication and exercise.

Type 2 diabetes is most common in people over 45 years old who are also overweight however the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults is dramatically increasing.

Similar to older-onset type 2 diabetes, the major predisposing risk factors are obesity, family history, and sedentary lifestyle.

Onset of diabetes at a younger age (defined here as up to age 40 years) is associated with longer disease exposure and increased risk for chronic complications.

Young-onset type 2 diabetes also. affects more individuals of working age, accentuating the adverse societal effects of the disease

Furthermore, evidence is accumulating that young-onset type 2 diabetes has a more aggressive disease phenotype.

This can lead to premature development of complications, with adverse effects on quality of life and unfavourable effects on long-term outcomes, raising the possibility of a future public health catastrophe.

Some pregnant women develop a third type called gestational diabetes.

It develops in 2-5% of pregnancies but usually disappears post-partum.

Having gestational diabetes means an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in later life.

Impaired glucose tolerance means blood glucose levels above what is considered normal but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes.

Although there is a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and so significant changes to lifestyle including diet and exercise are strongly encouraged.

Type 1 diabetes

Recognising type 1 diabetes is important and the onset of symptoms can often be rapid and include

  • abnormal thirst and dry mouth
  • frequent urination
  • extreme tiredness and lack of energy
  • constant hunger
  • sudden weight loss
  • slow healing wounds
  • recurrent infections
  • blurred vision

Type 2 diabetes

These symptoms can also occur in type 2 diabetes but are often less obvious as the onset is usually more gradual and therefore harder to detect.

When it is finally  diagnosed it may have developed several years earlier with complications already present.

With impaired insulin production and action, sugar remains in the blood causing hyperglycaemia or raised blood sugar and it is this that can cause short and long term issues which can compromise health and lifestyle.

In the longer term, living with diabetes can lead to complications and a diabetic should always be mindful and aware of changes in their health.

Changes to the feet can take place with loss of sensation called neuropathy and reduction in peripheral circulation which in turn can lead to compromised healing.

The Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry regularly perform diabetic foot checks for patients including

  • Visual health check
  • Skin colour and condition
  • Nail health
  • Pulse testing using Doppler
  • Sensation testing using 10g filament
  • Fine sensation testing using 128Hz tuning fork
  • Hot/cold temperature distinction

Early diagnosis and changes made to lifestyle and environment can significantly lessen the impact type 1 diabetes and those same changes in an adult can dramatically reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

There are many misconceptions about diabetes.

  • Anyone and everyone is at risk
  • Diabetes hits all populations regardless of income or social status
  • Diabetes is becoming increasingly common
  • More than 240 million people have diabetes worldwide
  • 380 million will have developed it by 2025
  • In Asia, Middle East, Oceania and Caribbean up to 20% of people are diabetic
  • Diabetes affects all age groups
  • Diabetes affects women proportionately slightly more than men
  • Up to 80% of type 2 diabetes is preventable

Ask us for a free copy of Diabetes : understanding your test results.

If you would like more information about foot care at Maidenhead Podiatry or to make an appointment to see one of our podiatrists please call 01628 773588 and speak to one of our reception team.

Need help with your feet or back – use our search bar.

Use our search bar the find what you are looking for

Many people visit our website for help or information on Podiatry or Chiropractic.

Both Podiatrists and Chiropractors offer a range of treatments and skills to benefit their patients but sometimes all you need is to be informed.

Below we describe what Podiatry and Chiropractic are and explain many of the treatments and services we offer but if you know what you are looking for then use the search bar in the top right hand corner of the screen.

A large part of what we provide for patients is help, advice and education and this website contains information on definition, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of conditions and all can be accessed through the search bar.

It doesn’t matter if you are looking for something specific or just curious. Give it a go. Find what you are looking for in our education pages and previous blogs. Click on the search bar.

Podiatry

Podiatry is defined as the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders; however, we assess, diagnose and treat from the knee down. We also treat warts on hands.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic is the management consists of a wide range of manipulative techniques designed to improve the function of joints, relieve pain and ease muscle spasm.

Chiropractors don’t only treat backs and can help with any soft-tissue or structural issues.

What is Podiatry?

Podiatry like many health care professions has general practitioners and specialists.

A general practitioner will treat anything from corns to verrucas and from plantar fasciitis or heel pain to ingrown toenails. We are all licenced to use local anaesthetic, perform minor surgeries such as ingrown nail removal and dispense antibiotics, if and where appropriate.

We provide vascular assessment and diabetic screening as a matter of course when requested or required. We have Podiatrists with special interests in areas such as diabetic care and biomechanical assessment and gait analysisGait analysis includes being filmed on a treadmill followed where appropriate by prescription of custom moulded orthotics together with an integrated exercise and rehabilitation program.

Seven Podiatrists and two Chiropractors trained in using the latest treatment and cutting-edge technology for a range of common conditions.

Cutting edge technology

Shockwave, which is a percussive mechanical treatment for chronic, or long-term, soft tissue pain such as heel pain, Achilles pain, hip pain and of course plantar fasciitis although it can be used anywhere in the body. It is used by both Podiatrists and Chiropractors

We were one of the first clinics in the country to use Swift, a microwave generator for the treatment of verrucas. We also offer salicylic acid, freezing and needling.

We offer all general foot care too including fungal nails, athlete’s foot, splits, fissures and infections. We also provide foot care in nursing and care homes as well as a domiciliary/home visiting service.

Contact us

Hopefully you have found what you are looking for but just in case you haven’t, give us a call on 01628 773588 and let us educate you. To find us follow the map and directions or put SL6 5FH into your sat nav.

We have our own free car park directly outside the clinic. Our premises are disabled friendly with no door thresholds and easy access throughout the ground floor. Let us know if you have any special requirements.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment give us a call on 01628 773588, and speak to one of our friendly receptionists or arrange a call back from one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors.

And, we will of course cut your toenails too.

What is gout and do you have it?

Do I have gout?

Arthritis is a disease of the joints which results in them to become inflamed and stiff.

There are three main types of arthritis – Rheumatoid arthritis, Osteo-arthritis and the less common form, Gout.

What is gout and what causes it?

Gout is the result of too much uric acid in the body leading to a build-up in the blood. Small crystals can form, collecting in the joints causing irritation and inflammation, which can be painful and severe.

Is it serious?

Apart from the severe pain that gout can cause, most other side effects of gout are rare but can include kidney damage because crystals form to create kidney stones which are known for being extremely painful to pass.

Who gets it?

1 in 200 people are affected by gout. More men than women are affected and it tends to appear in middle age but can run in families.

How do I know I have it?

The main symptom of gout is waking during the night with an acute throbbing pain in the big toe, which is also swollen. Usually only one of the big toes is affected. The pain lasts for a few hours and usually subsides not returning for a few months.

If it is more persistent, pain may be constant accompanied by swelling, redness and heat. If symptoms are persistent a visit to your GP is needed as they can be controlled by medication.

How do I prevent it?

You can reduce your chances of having attacks by leading a healthy lifestyle by:

  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Eating a healthy diet including what you drink (i.e. avoiding too much alcohol or fizzy drinks)
  • Making sure there is plenty of Vitamin C in your diet.

What are the treatments?

Gout can be controlled and regulated with anti-inflammatory drugs, which your GP will be able to prescribe, and these will alleviate the attack over 24 hours or so. Anti-gout medications are usually only taken during pain episodes.

When gout strikes, it helps to elevate your leg to reduce swelling together with the application of ice or cooling lotions while waiting for your medication to take effect.

Your podiatrist will also be able to increase comfort through advice and adapting your existing footwear with orthoses or other specialist insoles to help redistribute pressure away from the affected joints.

Made-to-measure shoes can also be prescribed and your podiatrist will be able to advise you on the correct type of shoes to wear and where to obtain them.

They can also provide protective shields for your toes or padding to relieve pressure and thereby reducing friction. Any secondary problems like ulcers or corns can also be treated.  They can also refer you to a specialist for more serious cases.

When should I see a Podiatrist?

If you experience any foot care issues which do not resolve themselves naturally or through routine foot care within three weeks, it is recommended to seek the help of a healthcare professional.

To talk to a podiatrist (also known as a chiropodist) – https://maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk/what-is-a-podiatrist/ – about the options available regarding treatment, you can contact an NHS Podiatrist or a private practice Podiatrist.

In both cases, always ensure that any practitioners you visit are registered with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC) and describe themselves as a Podiatrist (or Chiropodist).

In the NHS, through your GP, Specialist teams of rheumatologists, podiatrists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, along with specialist nurses, will provide the most effective care and treatment for patients with arthritis, especially those with rheumatoid arthritis.

To contact an NHS Podiatrist, please contact your GP practice for information on an NHS referral (in some areas you can self-refer).

If you would like more information or an appointment with one of our Podiatrists give us a call on 01628 773588 and speak to our reception team.

Do you have small bumps around your heels?

Do you have small bumps around your heels?

Many people are concerned that they have small lumps around the circumference of their heels.

Although they can appear alarming they are known as piezogenic papules are quite harmless and in the main, painless.

They comprise soft, compressible lumps, often on the back and round the side of the heel  and commonly on both feet.

A determining feature is that they vanish when the foot is off the ground.

What causes them?

The cause is small herniations in the fatty tissue of the heel(s) breaking through tiny tears in the fascia (retaining connective tissue) of the heel under load, which is why they are invisible when the foot is lifted from the floor.

Piezogenic papules are more likely in the young and athletic and tend to occur more commonly in females than males.

People who have the connective tissue disorder, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are more susceptible, as are those who stand for long periods of time such as shop workers and hairdressers.

Athletes such as long distance runners may well develop piezogenic papules.

Why do some people get them and not others?

They are not age or race specific.

Weight is sometimes a causative factor.

Ranging from 2 mm to 2 cm in size, they are usually pain free.

Occasionally they can be painful if nerves herniate through the fascia together with the fatty tissue.

Painful papules are usually larger than 2cm, are less frequent and usually linked to a history of long periods of standing.

What can I do?

Painful piezogenic papules require some change in lifestyle, reducing weight bearing exercise and where appropriate, reduction of body weight.

Compression stockings can assist by preventing the herniations in the first place, while heel cups or taping may help relieve pain.

A visit to your Podiatrist will guide you towards a tailored solution, from exercise to orthotics.

When the papules are painless benign neglect is the best policy.

If you would like more information or an appointment with one of our Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry, call us on 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Red, itchy toes? Could it be chilblains?

We are open during lockdown. Click here to read our covid precautions.

Do you have chilblains?

Cold weather always brings an increase in enquiries prompted by cherry red, itchy and sometimes, weepy toe tips. With temperatures due to dip below -7degreesC this week we have already seen an increase in concerned callers.

Our Podiatrists at Maidenhead Podiatry understand many people suffer from cold feet in winter, but not all develop chilblains. A question regularly asked is ‘why do I have chilblains? What have I done wrong?’ But is isn’t a matter of doing anything ‘wrong’, some people are simply prone to them due to genetics or poor peripheral circulation.

Of course, not everyone with poor circulation develops chilblains but it can make you more susceptible.

What do chilblains look like?

Following exposure to the cold chilblains appear as small itchy, red swellings on the skin of the tips of the toes and/or fingers. They can appear in a little as a couple of hours and can become increasingly painful. They normally start as small cherry red dots or patches which can slowly increase in size with a slight feel of firmness. It is possible that they will swell, form small blisters, and may weep before drying out leaving cracks in the skin, exposing the foot to the risk of infection.

They normally occur on tips of toes, particularly the smaller ones, but can also appear anywhere on the foot, on fingers, face, especially the nose, and the lobes of the ears. They can also occur on areas of the feet exposed to pressure, for example, on a bunion, heel or where the second toe is squeezed by tight shoes.

Chilblains are usually caused by the skin’s abnormal reaction to cold although exposure, damp or drafty conditions, dietary factors and hormonal imbalance can contribute.

If the skin is chilled, and is then followed by too rapid warming next to a fire or hot water bottle, shower or bath, chilblains may result.Frozen leaves

Who is most at risk?

This condition mainly affects young adults working outdoors, in cold places, or people who do not wear socks or tights during .colder weather. Too often, even in cold weather, patients attend Clinic wearing light footwear with no socks leaving their feet vulnerable to extremes of temperature.

Also susceptible are elderly people, and those whose circulation is less efficient that it used to be, people who don’t take enough exercise, and those suffering from anaemia.

Chilblains can develop at any age and frequently skip a few years before reappearing predictably in cold weather.

What causes chilblains?

When the toe and skin is cold, blood vessels near the surface vaso-constrict or get narrower. If the skin is then exposed to heat, or experiences a rapid change in temperature, the blood vessels become wider or dilate.

If this happens too quickly, blood vessels near the surface of the skin can’t always handle the increased blood flow and this can cause blood to leak into the surrounding tissue, which causes the swelling and itchiness associated with chilblains.

What are the symptoms?

With the onset of the cold weather, chilblains will be experienced as burning and itching on their hands and feet. On entering a warm room, the itching and burning is intensified. There can be swelling or redness, and in extreme cases, the surface of the skin may break, with sores (ulcers) developing.

If in doubt – seek professional advice and visit your Podiatrist.

foot in snowHow long do chilblains last?

Some come and go over a few days, others can persist for a couple of months at a time, only disappearing with warmer weather. Chilblains are virtually unknown in warmer climates but Britain’s cold damp winters are ideal for encouraging their appearance.

How do I prevent chilblains

This isn’t as easy but try to keep your body, feet and legs at an even temperature. This is especially important if your circulation is poor and you have limited mobility. Your whole body, rather the just the feet, needs to be kept warm. No matter how it might look, trousers, long johns, long boots, long socks tights and leg warmers  all help.

Do chilblain creams help?

Most chilblain creams work by counter-irritation. This means they use a different sensation, such as heat, to distract the brain from the itching and pain. Generally though, although they can bring relief they aren’t treating the underlying condition and have little influence on the length of time the chilblain is experienced.

If  chilblains have developed what can I do?

Whatever you do, don’t scratch them. Soothing lotions such as witch hazel or calamine, which can be bought from your local pharmacy, will take away most of the discomfort.

Cover them with a loose, dry plaster and wear warm socks.

If the chilblain has ulcerated, apply an antiseptic dressing. If you have diabetes or undergoing medical treatment, have the ulcer assessed by your GP or Chiropodist/Podiatrist.

Ultimately, time and warmer weather will bring lasting relief, and in the worst cases, a move to warmer climes will provide permanent relief.

If you would like more information or an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588 or e-mail  info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

What is a Podiatrist?

What is a Podiatrist and what can they do for me?

This article will guide you through the many and varied aspects of Podiatry and help you find the foot care that suits you best. To assist in stopping the development of preventable foot problems and advise you in self care.

To offer a better understanding of the foot care options available to an individual we have split this blog into sections starting with the simplest or self care and escalating to the most complex or podiatric surgery as an end point.

  • Self care and footwear

 

Not everyone needs to become a patient. Many foot conditions can be safely and appropriately managed with the right equipment, skills and confidence.

Many foot health advice leaflets are available through the NHS and the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists and your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

Poor choices in footwear can cause significant foot problems and seeking and following advice to make good choices of appropriate footwear can prevent development of new conditions, aggravation of existing ones and prevention of falls. Again, your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

  • Footcare

Simple footcare is defined as nail cutting and skin care including the tasks that healthy adults would normally carry out as part of their daily personal hygiene routine.

Of course this doesn’t apply to everyone but it is an important aspect of footcare that ensures many individuals check their feet regularly while still mobile and pain free.

For those who do attend clinic regularly for simple footcare, examination of the feet during a routine appointment acts as an early detection system ensuring prompt intervention and prevention of developing more serious foot health problems.

PODIATRY

  • Core Podiatry
  • Nail surgery
  • Warts and verrucas
  • Fungal nails
  • Long term and neurological conditions

 

Core Podiatry is defined as ‘the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of common and more complex lower limb pathologies associated with toe nails, soft tissues and the musculo-skeletal system with the purpose of sustaining and improving foot health. (Farndon 2006).

The main foot conditions affecting older people (as opposed to children) requiring core podiatry are -nail problems, corns, callus, toe deformities, and falls prevention.

These conditions can be managed successfully by Podiatrists in the NHS and Private practice using a range of treatments including sharp debridement (scalpel), pharmacology (creams, tablets, steroid injection) and therapies (often in conjunction with footwear advice and and prescription of orthoses where appropriate0.

Although the call for Nail surgery is small – approximately 8 per 1000 GP patients – there is certainly a need for an effective, non-recurring treatment.

Since the 1970s partial or total nail avulsion has become a standard Podiatry procedure where part (the sides) or all of the nail are removed painlessly to the nail bed under local anaesthetic to resolve recurring problems with ingrown nails.

The likelihood of regrowth is reduced to almost zero (0.5%) with the application of  phenol to the nail bed.

Warts and verrucas are small skin growths caused by the human papilloma virus. Verrucas are warts on the feet, common in children and although harmless they can be painful.

Most verrucas will clear up without treatment within two years but there are numerous treatments available through your Podiatrist including

Fungal nails are very difficult to treat successfully. There are numerous topical applications available as well as GP only prescribed oral medication. Your Podiatrist will discuss your best options and agree a treatment plan.

Long term and neurological conditions include conditions such as Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke and Parkinson’s and a Podiatrist’s management often involves management and prevention of potential escalation of foot problems.

Core podiatry is essential in maintaining the integrity of the feet of people whose medical condition places them at risk of developing complex problems.

Falls prevention. Foot problems in older people are often associated with impaired balance and mobility and where there is a history of multiple falls there are usually more foot issues.

The existence of a corn, bunion or poor footwear choices are often at play and podiatry intervention can moderate the risks.

ORTHOTICS

  • Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision
  • Podopaediatrics
  • Sports injuries
  • Footwear

Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision. Bio-mechanics and bio-mechanical assessment are an essential part of podiatry provision and the discussion of findings and correction of underlying issues with orthoses can have positive implications across the breath of podiatry services.

Many patients present with musculo-skeletal pain caused by bio-mechanical problems which can involve foot, knee, hip and lower back affecting gait (the way they walk).

Often the most cost effective and appropriate treatment is the provision of orthoses (specialist insoles) which modify and correct the bio-mechanical problem.

There are a number of different orthoses that can be prescribed by your Podiatrist depending on presenting condition and patient need. Orthoses range from a simple heel raise or cushioned insole to specific complex custom devices.

Podopaediatrics focuses on provision of Podiatry for children. This ranges from treatment of warts and verrucas to early identification of foot deformities. From gait assessment to prescription of orthoses.

Sports injuries often occur due to abnormal rotation and deformation of joints and/or muscles. Podiatrists target improvement and resolution through bio-mechanical assessment and prescription of orthoses combined with strengthening exercises and footwear.

Footwear choices can directly affect foot conditions. Podiatrists offer advice from correct choices when buying shoes to measuring for custom made footwear depending on requirement.

SPECIALIST PODIATRY

– relates mainly to long term conditions and may or may not be provided within a general podiatry clinic.

  • Diabetes
  • Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders
  • Dermatology
  • Advanced technology

Diabetes care is one of the basic provisions of any Podiatry practice and your podiatrist can offer regular foot health assessment as part of good diabetic control and patient education.

Early detection of foot problems can ensure correct management and reduce the likelihood of critical long term changes.

Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) increase the need for a range of basic foot care services. Up to 90% of people with RA have some kind of foot involvement sometimes leading to the formation of callus corns and occasionally ulceration.

Early Podiatric intervention can improve long term outcomes.

Dermatology can be considered part of core Podiatry as many of the common skin problems seen on the feet are amenable to Podiatric treatment. From tinea pedis (athlete’s foot) to melanoma.

From verrucas to cellulitis you can ask your Podiatrist for advice.

Advanced technology is becoming more a part of day to day Podiatry provision. At Maidenhead Podiatry we use Swift – a microwave treatment – for verrucas, Shockwave for chronic soft tissue pain and Cryopen for freezing warts and verrucas.

EXTENDED SCOPE PRACTICE

Podiatrists who work in extended scope practice usually work in the NHS although they can be available in larger private practices and have undertaken additional training in their clinical areas  and may actively engage in the following –

  • non-medical prescribing
  • requesting blood tests
  • requesting scans
  • interpretations of test results
  • injection therapy
  • advanced vascular investigations

PODIATRIC SURGERY

Podiatric surgery is surgical treatment of the foot and associated structures carried out by a Podiatric Surgeon often as a day case and under a local anaesthetic.

In Conclusion good foot health has a fundamental link to health and well being. Poor foot health can have a significant impact on mobility, independence, and quality of life.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our experienced Podiatrists then give us a call today and make an appointment on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk and help lay the foundations of a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

 

Why do I have localised foot pain?

Why do I have pain in specific parts of my foot?

This is where the pain is usually sharp or persistent and is often focused on a single point or area.

Toes

Our nails tend to grow more slowly and more thickly as we get older. This is often a result of reduced circulation and years of bashing them against the inside of the end of shoes which make them thicken.

Nails

Nails are protection for the end of a toe. Trauma or repeat stress stimulates the body’s protective mechanism making the nails thicker so they offer more protection. This increases the pressure on the end of the toe and makes the sore and the nails harder to cut. One person in 50 will develop a condition called onychogryphosis. A thickened nail that looks like a ram’s horn – unsightly and painful when pressing against shoes.

This can occur at any age but is more likely as we get older.

What’s the best technique for nail cutting?

Use a file and a good pair of nail clippers on thick nails. Clippers are sharper and have a different cutting action to scissors which can split the nail. Have a bath first and, if you have a partner, and good eyesight, you can always cut each other’s toe nails.

What can we do for you?

People with onychogryphosis benefit from visiting a Podiatrist.

Thickened nails often need to be reduced and shaped with an electric file before they can be cut. This reduces discomfort, pressure and maintains the foot in better condition and prevents it from getting worse.

Why do I suffer joint pain?

One person in six over 50 will develop osteoarthritis in the mid-foot. According to a recent study at Keele University’s Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre. Osteoarthritis is characterised by inflammation around the joints, damage to cartilage and swelling, which causes pain, stiffness and restricts movement. Sometimes it causes bony bumps on the top of the foot. It is possible to develop osteoarthritis just in the feet.

What can I do about osteoarthritis pain?

The foot comprises 26 bones, 12 of which are in the mid-section. A big hip joint is well designed to take the whole body weight but that same weight has to go through each individual bone and small joint in the mid-foot. Risk factors include genetic predisposition, injury to the area and overuse.

Runners and people who stand for a living are more likely to develop problems. Good trainer-type shoes will help to minimise stress to the feet.

Losing weight can ease pressure on joints as well as judicious use of orthotic insoles.

What can your Podiatrist do for foot pain?

If you have pain in the mid-foot or the arch, see one of our Podiatrists for assessment and treatment plan. Advice will usually consist of management and guidance on footwear, padding and exercise but may include onward referral to an orthopedic consultant.

Is my pain due to corns or verrucas?

Commonly found over a joint surface, between the toes or on the sole of the foot, corns are a common cause of pain. They are usually caused by pressure and friction. Corns are areas of callous with a hard central portion that focuses pressure on the underlying structure and can cause momentary, eye-watering pain when compressed. They are formed of dead skin and have no blood supply.

A verruca is different because it is a viral infection of the skin and has a blood supply. Verrucas can also cause pain because they are also rich in nerve tissue. This means that when they are compressed – they hurt!

What is the treatment for corns?

Your Podiatrist can remove your corn completely but if the pressure and friction remain, they will grow back in time. Shoes are a common cause of corns and a change of footwear type can bring relief. Appropriate padding can also help.

Verrucas present a different problem and some treatment options can be found here.

What else could be causing my foot pain?

There are other possibilities including trauma, bruising, Morton’s neuroma, or a foreign body such as a piece of glass or an embedded hair.

If you would like more information, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Why do I have foot pain?

Why do my feet hurt?

In a series of blogs this month we will look at the causes of foot pain. There are many reasons why anyone can experience different levels and types of foot pain.

Sharp or dull, bruised, or persistent, pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!

This list is not exhaustive but deals with some of the main reasons for calls to Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic.

Ankle/heel pain

This is a very common condition and is often worse in the mornings getting out of bed, or after brief periods of sitting such as having a coffee. Plantar Fasciitis is widely known and there are numerous treatments available from stretching to insoles, from steroid injections to Shockwave Pain can also be caused by heels spurs, heel bursitis, Haglund’s deformity, and Achilles tendinopathy among others.

Arch and large toe pain

Pain is also often experienced along the inner arch of the foot and into the large toe joint although it can be in either of both. Arch pain can be due to changes in the strength and position of the foot and custom insoles following biomechanical assessment may be the best solution. This is common in runners and can be linked to over-pronation. Large toe joint pain can be due to ill-fitting footwear in the past and is often associated with enlargement of the joint and bunions. It can also be due to arthritic changes.

Localised, specific pain

This is where the pain is usually sharp and persistent, focused on a single point. Commonly found over a joint surface, between the toes or on the sole of the foot, the most common cause is corns. Corns are areas of callous with a hard central portion that focuses pressure on the underlying structures and can cause momentary eye-watering pain. Verrucas can also cause pain because they are rich in nerve tissue. This means that when they are compressed – they hurt! There are other possibilities including trauma, bruising, Morton’s neuroma, or a foreign body such as a piece of glass or an embedded hair.

Referred pain

Often pain in the foot or feet doesn’t have a local origin. Pain can often be referred from higher up a nerve but be experienced in the extremity. A common origin of referred pain in the lower back. Damage, degeneration, or repeat stress in the back can lead to the impingement or compressing of a nerve root leading to a reaction in the foot or lower leg.

Our Chiropractors or our Podiatrists will include this in their initial assessment as they form a treatment plan.

Ingrown nails

Anyone who has had an ingrown nail will know how painful they can be. This is where the nail grows painfully into the side of the toe, often made worse by shoes pressing. This can be caused by picking and tearing the nail, poor cutting – usually down the side, or simply be due to bad luck. Some toes are shaped in such a way as to make ingrown nails almost inevitable where others will never experience it. Ingrown nails vary in severity from constant soreness to infected and weeping.

Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic offer a comprehensive ingrown nail treatment service, no matter the condition.

Compensation pain

Pain in the foot causes a person to walk differently or limp to take the load off the painful area. This is the body’s autonomic response to pain. This response is designed to protect the painful area. However, this in turn places increased stress on other structures that have to compensate for the change. In this way, a pain in the foot can cause pain elsewhere such as in the lower back, hip, and knee.

Other causes of pain

This list is not comprehensive and there are many other causes of foot pain. These include:

  • fracture
  • stress fracture-dislocation
  • soft tissue injuries
  • infection
  • skin infection
  • neuropathic changes

Remember, pain is a warning don’t ignore it!

Give us a call!

If you are experiencing foot pain and you would like more information give us a call on 01628 773588.

To make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors, please give us a call on 01628 773588.

If you would like a comprehensive biomechanical assessment do give us a call on 01628 773588.

For more information visit www.maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

If you would like to know more about how we are risk assessing and managing our Covid-19 click here.

In our lifetime we walk over 100,000 miles! Are you ready?

In an average lifetime, it is estimated that we walk about 100,000 miles / 160,000 km.

Just think about that for a moment. One hundred thousand miles! At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are often asked “how does walking affect my feet?”

What are the benefits?

Walking helps the ligaments, tendons, and muscles in our feet to work more efficiently and helps maintain suppleness and flexibility. Walking at a brisk pace for regular exercise helps condition your body and improves overall cardiovascular health in the same way as running and jogging. However, compared with running, walking carries a significantly lower risk of injury.

What can I do?

So even if your job involves sitting in the office or at home, try to get up and walk briskly for at least 30 minutes every day. Consult your Podiatrist if you start to develop any pain when walking, or consider a visit before embarking on a new walking program.

Feet are adaptable and will withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you enjoy walking, it’s important to wear the right footwear, which doesn’t damage your feet.

What about footwear?

The key to keeping your feet healthy and comfortable, regardless of the type of walking you do, is wearing properly fitting shoes or boots.

When buying walking shoes, try several different brands, styles, and most importantly, sizes. Remember, your feet can expand as much as half a size during the day, so buy shoes in the afternoon or early evening when your feet are at their largest. This will help protect them as they expand during your long walks. Also, wearing the same type of socks when fitting shoes that you wear when you walk will help you choose the right shoe and once you have made your purchase – take care of them.

What else should I think about?

If you are going on a long walk, prepare well ahead. Wear your shoes for a ‘trial walk’ and build up the distance gradually; don’t try to complete the London Marathon on your first trip! It’s also a good idea to pay a visit to your local HCPC – registered podiatrist who will be able to give advice and treat any corns, callus, or any foot issue you may have.

Take some first aid supplies, like plasters or antiseptic cream, on your walking trip in case of accidents. It’s also a good idea to put rub Vaseline/petroleum jelly between your toes to prevent chafing.

So, let’s get started

Begin at a slow pace and gradually increase the speed of your walk. This will give the muscles, bones, tendons, and ligaments that make up your feet the chance to get gradually used to the activity. If you experience any discomfort or foot pain, then it may be an indication that something is wrong. In many cases, early diagnosis can prevent a small injury from becoming a larger one. You are never too old to start!

Here are 10 tips to bear in mind:

  • When buying shoes, wear the same socks that you will wear when walking.
  • Try on at least four or five pairs of shoes.
  • Don’t walk too far in new shoes.
  • Put on and lace both shoes of each pair and walk around for a minute or two.
  • Good foot care is essential in keeping your feet comfortable and fatigue and injury-free.
  • If you experience any sort of foot pain, consult a Podiatrist.
  • Build your distance up gradually.
  • Before and after you walk, go through a warm-up and stretching routine.
  • Look after your feet and you too will cover at least 100,000 miles!

For more information on walking or any other foot care issue, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, please call 01628 773588, or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.