Category Archives: Shockwave

We are open! Read how we manage Covid-19 risk.

Although Covid-19 restrictions have eased, we are open, working, and taking appointments for Podiatry and Chiropractic

Covid-19 brought many changes to our lives during the lockdown. Although many regulations have been eased or lifted, wWe are still having to take measures and considerations that will be with us into next year.

As you are reading this we hope you are all well and staying safe.

The purpose of this page is to keep our patients in touch with what we are, and will be doing to ensure they can safely visit the clinic.

We are open and taking appointments for both Podiatry and Chiropractic.

The reception team is waiting to take your call

If you wish to make an appointment for Podiatry or Chiropractic please call 01628 773588 to speak to us or leave your name and number and a short message or email us at info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

What you can expect from us.

  • You will notice that Reception looks a little different.

  • We have perspex sneeze/cough guards for the desks similar to the ones now commonplace in supermarkets.
  • These stand 750mm high and run the length of the desk and provide protection for both staff and customers alike.
  • Reception is once more being used for waiting – socially distanced of course
  • You must still wear a face mask at all times while in the building – if you are exempt from wearing a facemask you must wear a face shield.
  • We ask you not to use the toilets but if you must, you must.
  • All magazines and newspapers have been removed from the reception area.
  • The water cooler will no longer be available to reduce the risk of cross contamination.
  • Your Podiatrist or Chiropractor will be wearing appropriate PPE.
  • Our receptionists will be wearing masks at all times.
  • All door handles and surfaces will be wiped down after each patient visit.
  • Where there is more than one practitioner working, appointments will be staggered to reduce the likelihood of queueing at the desk.

What we can expect from you.

  • Come in – wear a mask – sanitise your hands and wait, socially distanced, in reception.
  • You don’t have to wear gloves and there are automatic hand sanitising gel dispensers in the entrance lobby and reception area.
  • We ask that patients also wear a face mask at all times when in the building.
  • Wherever possible only one person at a time to attend for an appointment unless a carer, someone in the same bubble, parent or guardian is needed.
  • The contactless limit has gone up to £100. Most people will be able to ‘tap and pay’ thereby removing the need to key in an PIN.

During treatments

  • Appropriate PPE (personal protective equipment) will be worn by your Podiatrist or Chiropractor.
  • Between patient visits additional time is now to be allowed for wiping down and sanitising the treatment room after each appointment.
  • Each room contains an industry-standard air cleaner/purifier to ensure as clean an atmosphere as possible.
  • As always, all instruments are cleaned and sterilised between patients and all consumables are disposable.

All these changes will be kept under constant review.

If you have any special requirements please let us know. If you would like an appointment then please call us on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

(Radial) Shockwave Therapy (SWT)

(Radial) SHOCKWAVE Therapy (SWT)

Radial Shockwave is a tried, tested, and well-researched treatment used in physiotherapy since the 1990s. It has gained popularity due to its effectiveness and application across a wide range of professions.

What would you use it for?

SWT is used by both our podiatrists and our chiropractors to treat a variety of conditions including those listed below. The list isn’t exclusive:

  • Heel pain – Plantar fasciitis
  • Shoulder pain
  • Tennis elbow – lateral epicondylitis
  • Golfer’s elbow – medial epicondylitis
  • Heel spur
  • Hip pain
  • Rotator cuff – calcifying tendonitis
  • Jumper’s knee – quadriceps tendonitis
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Chronic tendinopathy including Achilles tendonitis

How does it work?

Shockwaves are transient acoustic waves which uniquely transmit high energy peaks used to both disintegrate and heal.

Shockwave Therapy is supported by numerous clinical studies attesting to its healing and reparative effects on tissue with over 80% success in relieving symptoms and reducing or eliminating pain.

SWT is tested and approved by physicians all over the world and used from out-patient clinics to amateur sportspeople to Olympic athletes. Also is used in rehabilitation, podiatry, chiropractic, physiotherapy, orthopaedics, veterinary medicine, aesthetics, and dermatology.

Medical effects

The high energy peak acoustic waves generated by SWT interact with tissue stimulating the medical effects of accelerating tissue repair and cell growth, reducing pain, and improving range of movement.

Some of the independent and combined effects of SWT are:

  • Capillary micro-ruptures in tendon and bone trigger repair processes leading to the creation of new blood vessels reversing chronic inflammation by increasing mast cell activity
  • Collagen production is stimulated by accelerated procollagen synthesis
  • Breaking down of calcium build-up in calcific disorders
  • Dispersion of pain mediators
  • Trigger point release.

Frequently asked questions

Will Shock Wave Therapy help me?

Most people experiencing chronic pain have unsuccessfully tried other treatments. Over 80% of the same people worldwide report SWT has helped resolve their condition.

How long does it take?

The application of SWT within your appointment is normally completed in around five minutes.

Does it hurt?

Depending on the level of pain already being experienced in the area to be treated there may be some discomfort. Treatments normally last less than five minutes meaning that any discomfort is tolerable but the intensity can be varied during the session to suit patient preference.

How many treatments will I need?

This varies depending on the nature of the condition being treated and the response of the patient. Effects are cumulative, typically more than one but fewer than six visits with relief normally experienced from the first visit onwards.

Will there be any soreness afterwards?

Sometimes there may be some tenderness for a short period but nothing intolerable or limiting.

Is there anything I can’t do following treatment?

It is sensible to avoid physical exertion for a couple of days following treatment to allow healing to take place.

If you would like more information or to book an appointment with one of our podiatrists or chiropractors please call 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk

Need help with your feet or back – use our search bar.

Use our search bar the find what you are looking for

Many people visit our website for help or information on Podiatry or Chiropractic.

Both Podiatrists and Chiropractors offer a range of treatments and skills to benefit their patients but sometimes all you need is to be informed.

Below we describe what Podiatry and Chiropractic are and explain many of the treatments and services we offer but if you know what you are looking for then use the search bar in the top right hand corner of the screen.

A large part of what we provide for patients is help, advice and education and this website contains information on definition, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of conditions and all can be accessed through the search bar.

It doesn’t matter if you are looking for something specific or just curious. Give it a go. Find what you are looking for in our education pages and previous blogs. Click on the search bar.

Podiatry

Podiatry is defined as the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders; however, we assess, diagnose and treat from the knee down. We also treat warts on hands.

Chiropractic

Chiropractic is the management consists of a wide range of manipulative techniques designed to improve the function of joints, relieve pain and ease muscle spasm.

Chiropractors don’t only treat backs and can help with any soft-tissue or structural issues.

What is Podiatry?

Podiatry like many health care professions has general practitioners and specialists.

A general practitioner will treat anything from corns to verrucas and from plantar fasciitis or heel pain to ingrown toenails. We are all licenced to use local anaesthetic, perform minor surgeries such as ingrown nail removal and dispense antibiotics, if and where appropriate.

We provide vascular assessment and diabetic screening as a matter of course when requested or required. We have Podiatrists with special interests in areas such as diabetic care and biomechanical assessment and gait analysisGait analysis includes being filmed on a treadmill followed where appropriate by prescription of custom moulded orthotics together with an integrated exercise and rehabilitation program.

Seven Podiatrists and two Chiropractors trained in using the latest treatment and cutting-edge technology for a range of common conditions.

Cutting edge technology

Shockwave, which is a percussive mechanical treatment for chronic, or long-term, soft tissue pain such as heel pain, Achilles pain, hip pain and of course plantar fasciitis although it can be used anywhere in the body. It is used by both Podiatrists and Chiropractors

We were one of the first clinics in the country to use Swift, a microwave generator for the treatment of verrucas. We also offer salicylic acid, freezing and needling.

We offer all general foot care too including fungal nails, athlete’s foot, splits, fissures and infections. We also provide foot care in nursing and care homes as well as a domiciliary/home visiting service.

Contact us

Hopefully you have found what you are looking for but just in case you haven’t, give us a call on 01628 773588 and let us educate you. To find us follow the map and directions or put SL6 5FH into your sat nav.

We have our own free car park directly outside the clinic. Our premises are disabled friendly with no door thresholds and easy access throughout the ground floor. Let us know if you have any special requirements.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment give us a call on 01628 773588, and speak to one of our friendly receptionists or arrange a call back from one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors.

And, we will of course cut your toenails too.

What is a Podiatrist?

What is a Podiatrist and what can they do for me?

This article will guide you through the many and varied aspects of Podiatry and help you find the foot care that suits you best. To assist in stopping the development of preventable foot problems and advise you in self care.

To offer a better understanding of the foot care options available to an individual we have split this blog into sections starting with the simplest or self care and escalating to the most complex or podiatric surgery as an end point.

  • Self care and footwear

 

Not everyone needs to become a patient. Many foot conditions can be safely and appropriately managed with the right equipment, skills and confidence.

Many foot health advice leaflets are available through the NHS and the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists and your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

Poor choices in footwear can cause significant foot problems and seeking and following advice to make good choices of appropriate footwear can prevent development of new conditions, aggravation of existing ones and prevention of falls. Again, your Podiatrist will be happy to give you advice and guidance.

  • Footcare

Simple footcare is defined as nail cutting and skin care including the tasks that healthy adults would normally carry out as part of their daily personal hygiene routine.

Of course this doesn’t apply to everyone but it is an important aspect of footcare that ensures many individuals check their feet regularly while still mobile and pain free.

For those who do attend clinic regularly for simple footcare, examination of the feet during a routine appointment acts as an early detection system ensuring prompt intervention and prevention of developing more serious foot health problems.

PODIATRY

  • Core Podiatry
  • Nail surgery
  • Warts and verrucas
  • Fungal nails
  • Long term and neurological conditions

 

Core Podiatry is defined as ‘the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of common and more complex lower limb pathologies associated with toe nails, soft tissues and the musculo-skeletal system with the purpose of sustaining and improving foot health. (Farndon 2006).

The main foot conditions affecting older people (as opposed to children) requiring core podiatry are -nail problems, corns, callus, toe deformities, and falls prevention.

These conditions can be managed successfully by Podiatrists in the NHS and Private practice using a range of treatments including sharp debridement (scalpel), pharmacology (creams, tablets, steroid injection) and therapies (often in conjunction with footwear advice and and prescription of orthoses where appropriate0.

Although the call for Nail surgery is small – approximately 8 per 1000 GP patients – there is certainly a need for an effective, non-recurring treatment.

Since the 1970s partial or total nail avulsion has become a standard Podiatry procedure where part (the sides) or all of the nail are removed painlessly to the nail bed under local anaesthetic to resolve recurring problems with ingrown nails.

The likelihood of regrowth is reduced to almost zero (0.5%) with the application of  phenol to the nail bed.

Warts and verrucas are small skin growths caused by the human papilloma virus. Verrucas are warts on the feet, common in children and although harmless they can be painful.

Most verrucas will clear up without treatment within two years but there are numerous treatments available through your Podiatrist including

Fungal nails are very difficult to treat successfully. There are numerous topical applications available as well as GP only prescribed oral medication. Your Podiatrist will discuss your best options and agree a treatment plan.

Long term and neurological conditions include conditions such as Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke and Parkinson’s and a Podiatrist’s management often involves management and prevention of potential escalation of foot problems.

Core podiatry is essential in maintaining the integrity of the feet of people whose medical condition places them at risk of developing complex problems.

Falls prevention. Foot problems in older people are often associated with impaired balance and mobility and where there is a history of multiple falls there are usually more foot issues.

The existence of a corn, bunion or poor footwear choices are often at play and podiatry intervention can moderate the risks.

ORTHOTICS

  • Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision
  • Podopaediatrics
  • Sports injuries
  • Footwear

Orthotics, footwear and Musculo-skeletal provision. Bio-mechanics and bio-mechanical assessment are an essential part of podiatry provision and the discussion of findings and correction of underlying issues with orthoses can have positive implications across the breath of podiatry services.

Many patients present with musculo-skeletal pain caused by bio-mechanical problems which can involve foot, knee, hip and lower back affecting gait (the way they walk).

Often the most cost effective and appropriate treatment is the provision of orthoses (specialist insoles) which modify and correct the bio-mechanical problem.

There are a number of different orthoses that can be prescribed by your Podiatrist depending on presenting condition and patient need. Orthoses range from a simple heel raise or cushioned insole to specific complex custom devices.

Podopaediatrics focuses on provision of Podiatry for children. This ranges from treatment of warts and verrucas to early identification of foot deformities. From gait assessment to prescription of orthoses.

Sports injuries often occur due to abnormal rotation and deformation of joints and/or muscles. Podiatrists target improvement and resolution through bio-mechanical assessment and prescription of orthoses combined with strengthening exercises and footwear.

Footwear choices can directly affect foot conditions. Podiatrists offer advice from correct choices when buying shoes to measuring for custom made footwear depending on requirement.

SPECIALIST PODIATRY

– relates mainly to long term conditions and may or may not be provided within a general podiatry clinic.

  • Diabetes
  • Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders
  • Dermatology
  • Advanced technology

Diabetes care is one of the basic provisions of any Podiatry practice and your podiatrist can offer regular foot health assessment as part of good diabetic control and patient education.

Early detection of foot problems can ensure correct management and reduce the likelihood of critical long term changes.

Systemic musculo-skeletal disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) increase the need for a range of basic foot care services. Up to 90% of people with RA have some kind of foot involvement sometimes leading to the formation of callus corns and occasionally ulceration.

Early Podiatric intervention can improve long term outcomes.

Dermatology can be considered part of core Podiatry as many of the common skin problems seen on the feet are amenable to Podiatric treatment. From tinea pedis (athlete’s foot) to melanoma.

From verrucas to cellulitis you can ask your Podiatrist for advice.

Advanced technology is becoming more a part of day to day Podiatry provision. At Maidenhead Podiatry we use Swift – a microwave treatment – for verrucas, Shockwave for chronic soft tissue pain and Cryopen for freezing warts and verrucas.

EXTENDED SCOPE PRACTICE

Podiatrists who work in extended scope practice usually work in the NHS although they can be available in larger private practices and have undertaken additional training in their clinical areas  and may actively engage in the following –

  • non-medical prescribing
  • requesting blood tests
  • requesting scans
  • interpretations of test results
  • injection therapy
  • advanced vascular investigations

PODIATRIC SURGERY

Podiatric surgery is surgical treatment of the foot and associated structures carried out by a Podiatric Surgeon often as a day case and under a local anaesthetic.

In Conclusion good foot health has a fundamental link to health and well being. Poor foot health can have a significant impact on mobility, independence, and quality of life.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our experienced Podiatrists then give us a call today and make an appointment on 01628 773588 or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk and help lay the foundations of a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

 

Why do I have localised foot pain?

Why do I have pain in specific parts of my foot?

This is where the pain is usually sharp or persistent and is often focused on a single point or area.

Toes

Our nails tend to grow more slowly and more thickly as we get older. This is often a result of reduced circulation and years of bashing them against the inside of the end of shoes which make them thicken.

Nails

Nails are protection for the end of a toe. Trauma or repeat stress stimulates the body’s protective mechanism making the nails thicker so they offer more protection. This increases the pressure on the end of the toe and makes the sore and the nails harder to cut. One person in 50 will develop a condition called onychogryphosis. A thickened nail that looks like a ram’s horn – unsightly and painful when pressing against shoes.

This can occur at any age but is more likely as we get older.

What’s the best technique for nail cutting?

Use a file and a good pair of nail clippers on thick nails. Clippers are sharper and have a different cutting action to scissors which can split the nail. Have a bath first and, if you have a partner, and good eyesight, you can always cut each other’s toe nails.

What can we do for you?

People with onychogryphosis benefit from visiting a Podiatrist.

Thickened nails often need to be reduced and shaped with an electric file before they can be cut. This reduces discomfort, pressure and maintains the foot in better condition and prevents it from getting worse.

Why do I suffer joint pain?

One person in six over 50 will develop osteoarthritis in the mid-foot. According to a recent study at Keele University’s Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre. Osteoarthritis is characterised by inflammation around the joints, damage to cartilage and swelling, which causes pain, stiffness and restricts movement. Sometimes it causes bony bumps on the top of the foot. It is possible to develop osteoarthritis just in the feet.

What can I do about osteoarthritis pain?

The foot comprises 26 bones, 12 of which are in the mid-section. A big hip joint is well designed to take the whole body weight but that same weight has to go through each individual bone and small joint in the mid-foot. Risk factors include genetic predisposition, injury to the area and overuse.

Runners and people who stand for a living are more likely to develop problems. Good trainer-type shoes will help to minimise stress to the feet.

Losing weight can ease pressure on joints as well as judicious use of orthotic insoles.

What can your Podiatrist do for foot pain?

If you have pain in the mid-foot or the arch, see one of our Podiatrists for assessment and treatment plan. Advice will usually consist of management and guidance on footwear, padding and exercise but may include onward referral to an orthopedic consultant.

Is my pain due to corns or verrucas?

Commonly found over a joint surface, between the toes or on the sole of the foot, corns are a common cause of pain. They are usually caused by pressure and friction. Corns are areas of callous with a hard central portion that focuses pressure on the underlying structure and can cause momentary, eye-watering pain when compressed. They are formed of dead skin and have no blood supply.

A verruca is different because it is a viral infection of the skin and has a blood supply. Verrucas can also cause pain because they are also rich in nerve tissue. This means that when they are compressed – they hurt!

What is the treatment for corns?

Your Podiatrist can remove your corn completely but if the pressure and friction remain, they will grow back in time. Shoes are a common cause of corns and a change of footwear type can bring relief. Appropriate padding can also help.

Verrucas present a different problem and some treatment options can be found here.

What else could be causing my foot pain?

There are other possibilities including trauma, bruising, Morton’s neuroma, or a foreign body such as a piece of glass or an embedded hair.

If you would like more information, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Foot in vice

Why do I have pain in the arch and big toe?

What is the cause of my arch and big toe pain?

At Maidenhead Podiatry and Chiropractic Clinic, our Podiatrists are often asked about foot pain located in the inner long arch or inside of the foot. The pain often associated with pain in the large/big toe joint. It can also radiate up the leg.

When do I get the pain?

When exercising, the pain often doesn’t come on straight away, but can develop some time after starting. What can be happening, halfway through a round of golf or some miles into a walk, is that the small supporting muscles of the foot become fatigued. It may come on more rapidly with high impact exercise such as running. Inflammation may be involved meaning that the pain worsens the day following exertion.

Where do I get the pain?

Pain or discomfort can manifest along the inside of the foot or the inner longitudinal arch. It can also be associated with pain the base of the big toe and into the joint.

Because the discomfort of the foot is usually due to mechanical changes this can refer to compensation pain up the leg and into the knee, hip, or back.

Why do I get the pain?

If you ‘overpronate’ it causes medial or inward rotation of the lower leg, which can cause stress at the knee, misalignment of the hips, and resultant lower back pain. The degree of ‘pronation’ can vary from person to person and used to be known as ‘flat feet’ although the actual cause is more complex. As the muscle fatigue, this allows the arch to over-extend further stressing the support tissues and increasing discomfort.

Think of your feet as the ‘foundation’ for the rest of the body. Ensuring your feet are correctly aligned allows the rest of the kinetic chain or biomechanical relationship between the feet and the rest of the body to function efficiently. Big toe joint pain can be due to a number of reasons including inflammation, arthritis, and poorly fitting shoes.

What can I do about it?

What is most important with any foot pain is to ensure a correct diagnosis. This ensures targeted and appropriate treatment. This starts with a bio-mechanical assessment.

The assessment focuses on structure, alignment, strength, and starts with the foot. This includes pelvis, hips, knees, feet and their relationship, as pain in one area can result in or cause weakness or a structural problem somewhere else.

A biomechanical assessment is essential where there is a pain in the feet or lower limbs but no cause has so far been established. Sometimes simple recommendations on footwear can make a huge difference especially sports shoes. Simply tying shoelaces properly can dramatically increase the support offered to the foot by a shoe. There are many different ways to lace a shoe. For ideas and a bit of fun, click here for lacing ideas.

Pain in the large toe can be associated with this but can also be due to shoe pressure on the inner edge of the apex of the toe.

Buy shoes that have a square toe box to reduce this pressure.

What can we do about it?

Podiatrist Jeremy Ousey has a special interest in bio-mechanics There are numerous choices following a biomechanical assessment. The outcome of the assessment determines the appropriate treatment. If the mechanics of the foot are contributing to injury or pain, orthotics or custom made insoles are prescribed, moulded from a foam impression of the feet.

The orthotics are prescribed in conjunction with exercises and a carefully constructed rehabilitation plan. Footwear is also considered and recommendations made.

Topical treatments such as Shockwave can be very effective in the treatment of foot and lower limb pain.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with Jeremy  Ousey call 01628 773588 or e-mail  info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

Why do I have heel pain?

What is causing my heel pain?

At Maidenhead Podiatry our Podiatrists are regularly asked about heel pain which is often at its worst first thing in the morning or when walking after a period of rest.

The first part of the gait cycle, where your foot has its first contact with the ground, is called ‘heel strike’.

During walking and running your heels repeatedly hit, or strike, the ground with considerable force.

For correct function they need be able to absorb the impact and provide a firm support for the weight of the body through the gait cycle.

There are various types of heel pain.

Some of the most common are heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, heel bursitis and heel bumps (Haglund’s)

As heel pain is often associated with inflammation it means that the pain can worsen with rest.

This is why can can be at its most painful when we first get out of bed or when we have been sitting having a coffee and stand to walk.

“Pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!”

Heel spurs

These can generate pain but they are the most commonly misdiagnosed form of heel pain.

You can have heel spurs with no pain and pain with no heel spurs.

Even when pain is caused by heel spurs the pain may not persist even though the spurs do.

If you do have heel spur pain it is usually felt on standing, particularly first thing in the morning when you first put your feet on the floor from bed.

It is not uncommon, though tends to occur more in the over forty age group.

There is nothing to be seen on the heel but a deep localised painful spot can be found in or around the middle of the heel pad.

It is often associated with a spur of bone sticking out of the heel bone (heel spur syndrome), however approximately ten per cent of the population have heel spurs without any pain.

A clear diagnosis requires imaging, usually either X-ray or ultra-sound.

Plantar Fasciitis

Often similar in symptom to heel spurs, pain is usually experienced more to the inside of the heel around the insertion of a muscle called Anterior Tibialis towards the back of the inner arch.

This condition is often associated with over-pronation (rolling the foot inwards) during standing, walking and running.

Pain can also be due to inflexible calf muscles and repeat stress injury.

It can also be due poor footwear choices, old unsupportive shoes and injury, among other causes.

Diagnosis is often achieved with bio-mechanical assessment, with treatment through prescription of specialist custom insoles (orthotics) and the implementation of a rehabilitation and exercise programme.

Shockwave is also very effective treatment for plantar fasciitis.

Heel Bursitis

A bursa is a fluid filled sack the body uses for cushioning or padding, often under tendons.

When a bursa experiences trauma of repeat stress it can swell, leading to bursitis.

Pain can be felt at the back of the heel during ankle movement and there might be a swelling either side of the Achilles tendon.

Pain may also be felt deep inside the heel when it makes contact with the ground and can feel like a deep bruise.

Treatments can include rest, stretching exercises and orthotics.

Heel Bumps

These bumps are also known as Haglund’s Deformity.

This is recognised as a firm bump or enlargement of the bone on the back of the heel where the Achilles Tendon attaches.

Haglund’s are often associated with bursitis.

They are often caused by rubbing of the shoe heel counter and can be quite painful especially during exercise.

Treatments include changing or modifying footwear, stretching and ultimately, surgery.

What can you do for yourself?

Stretching can help with heel pain but it is dependant on knowing the cause so that your self-help is appropriate.

If pain persists consult a Podiatrist for assessment and a treatment plan.

Alternatively, you can speak to your GP who can arrange imaging, physiotherapy and if the pain persists, steroid injections.

Remember – pain is a warning – don’t ignore it!

What can we do for you?

Successful treatment is always based on accurate assessment.

We offer bio-mechanical assessment, gait analysis, custom orthotics and Shockwave – where appropriate.

More information is available on our website.

To make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists please call 01628 773588.