Tag Archives: foot pain

10 things you need to know about Arthritis…

Arthritis

Arthritis means inflammation or swelling of one or more joints. It is a ‘blanket term’ and describes more than 100 conditions that affect the joints, tissues around the joint, and other connective tissues. Specific symptoms vary depending on the type of arthritis, but usually include joint pain and stiffness.

There are three main types, but of course, there are many, many more.

Osteoarthritis (OA)

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting nearly nine million people in this country, and is more common over forty years of age, and in women.

Some people call it degenerative joint disease or “wear and tear” arthritis. It occurs most frequently in the hands, hips, and knees, but can manifest in any synovial joint, as they are lined with cartilage.

With OA, the cartilage within a joint begins to break down and the underlying bone begins to change. The These changes usually develop slowly and get worse over time. OA can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling. In some cases it also causes reduced function and disability; some people are no longer able to do daily tasks or work.

As OA advances, the changes in the underlying bone can mean that it breaks through the degenerating cartilage, forming osteophytes, resulting in bone resting on bone, increaing pain and further reducing mobility, as muscles, tendons and ligaments need to work harder to orovide the same movement.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

Rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, is an autoimmune and inflammatory disease, which means that your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake, causing inflammation (painful swelling) in the affected parts of the body. RA affects around 400,000 people in the UK, and usually starts between forty and fifty years old.

RA mainly attacks the joints, usually many joints at once. RA commonly affects joints in the hands, wrists, and knees. In a joint with RA, the lining of the joint becomes inflamed, causing damage to joint tissue. This tissue damage can cause long-lasting or chronic pain, unsteadiness (lack of balance), and deformity (misshapenness).

RA can also affect other tissues throughout the body and cause problems in organs such as the lungs, heart, and eyes.

 

Gout

Gout is a common form of inflammatory arthritis that is very painful. It usually affects one joint at a time (often the big toe joint). There are times when symptoms get worse, known as flares, and times when there are no symptoms, known as remission. Repeated bouts of gout can lead to gouty arthritis, a worsening form of arthritis.

Gout is often typified by acute, rapid onset pain, with no apparent cause. ‘Flares’ can  last from a day to several weeks and may respond to over-the-counter, anti-infammatory medication or may require a visit to your GP for something stronger. There is no cure for gout, but you can effectively treat and manage the condition with medication and self-management strategies.

Factors influencing gout are –

  • being male
  • obesity
  • hypertension
  • dieuretics
  • diabetes
  • alcohol
  • sugar
  • red meat, including offal
  • some seafoods including anchovies, sardines, mussels, scalops, trout and tuna

Other forms of arthritis and other related conditions include but are not restricted to –

  • ankylosing spondylisis – affects spine
  • cervical spondylitis – affects neck
  • fibromyalgia – pain in ligaments, tendons and muscles
  • lupus – auto-immune condition
  • psoriatic arthritis – in those with psoriasis
  • enteropathic arthritis – associated with bowel disease
  • reactive arthritis – often follows a UTI
  • secondary arthritis – arthritis following injury
  • polymyalgia rheumatica – auto-immune related

Maidenhead Podiatry can’t treat arthritis but it can help you manage the symptoms, advise on how you can help yourself, and make them easier to live with. So give us a call if you think we can help you.

If you would like more information or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists or Chiropractors, email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk call 01628 773588 and speak to one of our friendly reception team.

Why do I have localised foot pain?

Why do I have pain in specific parts of my foot?

This is where the pain is usually sharp or persistent and is often focused on a single point or area.

Toes

Our nails tend to grow more slowly and more thickly as we get older. This is often a result of reduced circulation and years of bashing them against the inside of the end of shoes which make them thicken.

Nails

Nails are protection for the end of a toe. Trauma or repeat stress stimulates the body’s protective mechanism making the nails thicker so they offer more protection. This increases the pressure on the end of the toe and makes the sore and the nails harder to cut. One person in 50 will develop a condition called onychogryphosis. A thickened nail that looks like a ram’s horn – unsightly and painful when pressing against shoes.

This can occur at any age but is more likely as we get older.

What’s the best technique for nail cutting?

Use a file and a good pair of nail clippers on thick nails. Clippers are sharper and have a different cutting action to scissors which can split the nail. Have a bath first and, if you have a partner, and good eyesight, you can always cut each other’s toe nails.

What can we do for you?

People with onychogryphosis benefit from visiting a Podiatrist.

Thickened nails often need to be reduced and shaped with an electric file before they can be cut. This reduces discomfort, pressure and maintains the foot in better condition and prevents it from getting worse.

Why do I suffer joint pain?

One person in six over 50 will develop osteoarthritis in the mid-foot. According to a recent study at Keele University’s Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre. Osteoarthritis is characterised by inflammation around the joints, damage to cartilage and swelling, which causes pain, stiffness and restricts movement. Sometimes it causes bony bumps on the top of the foot. It is possible to develop osteoarthritis just in the feet.

What can I do about osteoarthritis pain?

The foot comprises 26 bones, 12 of which are in the mid-section. A big hip joint is well designed to take the whole body weight but that same weight has to go through each individual bone and small joint in the mid-foot. Risk factors include genetic predisposition, injury to the area and overuse.

Runners and people who stand for a living are more likely to develop problems. Good trainer-type shoes will help to minimise stress to the feet.

Losing weight can ease pressure on joints as well as judicious use of orthotic insoles.

What can your Podiatrist do for foot pain?

If you have pain in the mid-foot or the arch, see one of our Podiatrists for assessment and treatment plan. Advice will usually consist of management and guidance on footwear, padding and exercise but may include onward referral to an orthopedic consultant.

Is my pain due to corns or verrucas?

Commonly found over a joint surface, between the toes or on the sole of the foot, corns are a common cause of pain. They are usually caused by pressure and friction. Corns are areas of callous with a hard central portion that focuses pressure on the underlying structure and can cause momentary, eye-watering pain when compressed. They are formed of dead skin and have no blood supply.

A verruca is different because it is a viral infection of the skin and has a blood supply. Verrucas can also cause pain because they are also rich in nerve tissue. This means that when they are compressed – they hurt!

What is the treatment for corns?

Your Podiatrist can remove your corn completely but if the pressure and friction remain, they will grow back in time. Shoes are a common cause of corns and a change of footwear type can bring relief. Appropriate padding can also help.

Verrucas present a different problem and some treatment options can be found here.

What else could be causing my foot pain?

There are other possibilities including trauma, bruising, Morton’s neuroma, or a foreign body such as a piece of glass or an embedded hair.

If you would like more information, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, call Maidenhead Podiatry on 01628 773588 or e-mail info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.

In our lifetime we walk over 100,000 miles! Are you ready?

In an average lifetime, it is estimated that we walk about 100,000 miles / 160,000 km.

Just think about that for a moment. One hundred thousand miles! At Maidenhead Podiatry, our Podiatrists are often asked “how does walking affect my feet?”

What are the benefits?

Walking helps the ligaments, tendons, and muscles in our feet to work more efficiently and helps maintain suppleness and flexibility. Walking at a brisk pace for regular exercise helps condition your body and improves overall cardiovascular health in the same way as running and jogging. However, compared with running, walking carries a significantly lower risk of injury.

What can I do?

So even if your job involves sitting in the office or at home, try to get up and walk briskly for at least 30 minutes every day. Consult your Podiatrist if you start to develop any pain when walking, or consider a visit before embarking on a new walking program.

Feet are adaptable and will withstand a lot of pressure before they complain. If you enjoy walking, it’s important to wear the right footwear, which doesn’t damage your feet.

What about footwear?

The key to keeping your feet healthy and comfortable, regardless of the type of walking you do, is wearing properly fitting shoes or boots.

When buying walking shoes, try several different brands, styles, and most importantly, sizes. Remember, your feet can expand as much as half a size during the day, so buy shoes in the afternoon or early evening when your feet are at their largest. This will help protect them as they expand during your long walks. Also, wearing the same type of socks when fitting shoes that you wear when you walk will help you choose the right shoe and once you have made your purchase – take care of them.

What else should I think about?

If you are going on a long walk, prepare well ahead. Wear your shoes for a ‘trial walk’ and build up the distance gradually; don’t try to complete the London Marathon on your first trip! It’s also a good idea to pay a visit to your local HCPC – registered podiatrist who will be able to give advice and treat any corns, callus, or any foot issue you may have.

Take some first aid supplies, like plasters or antiseptic cream, on your walking trip in case of accidents. It’s also a good idea to put rub Vaseline/petroleum jelly between your toes to prevent chafing.

So, let’s get started

Begin at a slow pace and gradually increase the speed of your walk. This will give the muscles, bones, tendons, and ligaments that make up your feet the chance to get gradually used to the activity. If you experience any discomfort or foot pain, then it may be an indication that something is wrong. In many cases, early diagnosis can prevent a small injury from becoming a larger one. You are never too old to start!

Here are 10 tips to bear in mind:

  • When buying shoes, wear the same socks that you will wear when walking.
  • Try on at least four or five pairs of shoes.
  • Don’t walk too far in new shoes.
  • Put on and lace both shoes of each pair and walk around for a minute or two.
  • Good foot care is essential in keeping your feet comfortable and fatigue and injury-free.
  • If you experience any sort of foot pain, consult a Podiatrist.
  • Build your distance up gradually.
  • Before and after you walk, go through a warm-up and stretching routine.
  • Look after your feet and you too will cover at least 100,000 miles!

For more information on walking or any other foot care issue, or to make an appointment with one of our Podiatrists, please call 01628 773588, or email info@maidenheadpodiatry.co.uk.